June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Reticular pseudodrusen drives the loss of scotopic function in intermediate age-related macular degeneration
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rose Tan
    Macular Research, Centre for Eye Research Australia, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Department of Surgery (Ophthalmology), The University of Melbourne, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Robyn H Guymer
    Macular Research, Centre for Eye Research Australia, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Department of Surgery (Ophthalmology), The University of Melbourne, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Chi D Luu
    Macular Research, Centre for Eye Research Australia, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Department of Surgery (Ophthalmology), The University of Melbourne, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Rose Tan, None; Robyn Guymer, None; Chi Luu, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Australia Awards Scholarship, Beckman Initiative for Macular Research grant and Macular Disease Foundation Australia grant
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 2349. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Rose Tan, Robyn H Guymer, Chi D Luu; Reticular pseudodrusen drives the loss of scotopic function in intermediate age-related macular degeneration. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):2349.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Data on scotopic function throughout the macula in eyes with intermediate AMD (iAMD) remains limited. This study evaluated retinotopic macular scotopic function in healthy controls and iAMD eyes with and without reticular pseudodrusen (RPD).

Methods : Scotopic thresholds for the 505 nm (cyan) and 620 nm (red) stimuli were obtained from 13 normal control, 15 iAMD without RPD and 15 iAMD with RPD participants, using a Medmont dark-adapted chromatic perimeter. Measurements were performed in one eye after 20 and 30 minutes of dark adaptation (DA) and the test grid consisted of 24 test locations spaced within the central 24°. The average point-wise sensitivity (PWS) for each stimulus and the sensitivity difference (cyan threshold - red threshold, for assessing rod function) were compared between the study groups.

Results : The average PWS in iAMD eyes without RPD for 550 nm (51.3 ± 6.7 dB, p = 1.00) and 620 nm stimuli (29.9± 4.8 dB, p = 1.00) were similar to that of the control eyes (51.6 ± 6.3 dB for 550 nm and 30.0 ± 5.3 dB for 620 nm). However, the average PWS in iAMD eye with RPD for the 550 nm and 620 nm stimulus were significantly reduced in the central 8° compared to control eyes (48.6 ± 9.7 dB, p < 0.001 and 28.7± 6.4 dB, p = 0.04, respectively). The sensitivity difference at 20 and 30 minutes DA of iAMD eyes without RPD was similar to that of the controls at all test points (p ≥ 0.68). In iAMD eyes with RPD, the sensitivity difference at 20 and 30 minutes DA was significantly smaller than that of the controls, but only at test locations within the central 8° (p ≤ 0.005).

Conclusions : Scotopic function is normal in iAMD eyes without RPD but is reduced in iAMD eyes with RPD, in the central 8°. These findings suggest that the abnormal rod function is likely driven by RPD rather than iAMD.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×