June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Student adherence and satisfaction with eyeglass usage in the Baltimore Reading and Eye Disease Study (BREDS)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Megan E Collins
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Amy Huang
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Lucy Mudie
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Rani Mukherjee
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Josephine Oweye
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Betsy Wolf
    Center for Research and Reform in Education, Johns Hopkins School of Education, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Robert Slavin
    Center for Research and Reform in Education, Johns Hopkins School of Education, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Michael X Repka
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • David S Friedman
    Ophthalmology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Megan Collins, None; Amy Huang, None; Lucy Mudie, None; Rani Mukherjee, None; Josephine Oweye, None; Betsy Wolf, None; Robert Slavin, None; Michael Repka, None; David Friedman, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Robert M & Diane v.S. Levy Family Foundation
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 2410. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Megan E Collins, Amy Huang, Lucy Mudie, Rani Mukherjee, Josephine Oweye, Betsy Wolf, Robert Slavin, Michael X Repka, David S Friedman; Student adherence and satisfaction with eyeglass usage in the Baltimore Reading and Eye Disease Study (BREDS). Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):2410.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : While school-based programs have become popular in identifying children with vision problems, few studies have examined the critical aspect of monitoring compliance after an initial intervention.[1] Poor adherence with glasses, a barrier to program efficacy, has been reported.[2] In our study, we examined student adherence and satisfaction with eyeglass usage in a school-based program.

Methods : Second and third graders attending twelve elementary schools received an in-school vision examination. Two pairs of eyeglasses were provided to children with refractive error (hyperopia >/=1D, myopia </=0.5D, astigmatism >/=1D). Replacements were provided for lost or broken glasses. Children prescribed glasses had a follow-up vision exam and interview regarding their use and attitudes about eyeglasses.

Results : Of 320 students examined, 66.4% were prescribed eyeglasses based on study criteria. In follow-up assessments during the same academic year, 87.4% were wearing glasses. 89.4% reported being happy with their glasses and 86.4% believed their glasses looked good on them. 68.2% felt their glasses helped them see 'a lot better' and 71.2% felt their glasses helped them read 'a lot better.' 20.2% reported being teased about wearing glasses.

Conclusions : In our school-based program, the majority of children were wearing glasses at follow-up. Most students were happy with glasses and the majority reported significant improvement in their ability to see and read. In our study, adherence with eyeglass use was higher than reported in previous studies.[3] This may be related to close monitoring and a robust replacement program. Social issues remain a barrier to compliance, as teasing was reported by one-fifth of students.
References:
1. Ethan D, Basch CE. Promoting healthy vision in students: Progress and challenges in policy, programs, and research. J Sch Health 2008; 78:411-416.
2. Messer DH. et al. Spectacle wear in children given spectacles through a school-based program. Optom Vis Sci Off Publ Am Acad Optom 2012; 89: 19.
3. Alvi RA et al. The Eagles Eye Mobile: Assessing its ability to deliver eye care in a high-risk community. J Pediatrc Ophthlamol Strabismus 2015; 52:98-105.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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