June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Glucose Effect on Cell Viability and VEGF Secretion in Retinal Endothelial Cells
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brandi S Betts-Obregon
    Biology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Jessica Buikema
    Biology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, United States
  • Andrew T C Tsin
    Biology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas, United States
    Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley School of Medicine, Edinburg, Texas, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Brandi Betts-Obregon, None; Jessica Buikema, None; Andrew Tsin, None
  • Footnotes
    Support   the RCMI Program from the National Institutes of Minority Health and Health Disparities (G12MD007591) at the National Institute of Health.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 2523. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Brandi S Betts-Obregon, Jessica Buikema, Andrew T C Tsin; Glucose Effect on Cell Viability and VEGF Secretion in Retinal Endothelial Cells. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):2523.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The objective of current study is to investigate the effect of glucose on retinal endothelial cell viability and VEGF secretion.

Methods : 20,000 cells per well were treated without glucose or with 5.5mM (euglycemic), 18.5mM and 30mM (hyperglycemic) glucose for 24 hours. Viable cells were counted using Trypan blue dye exclusion method. ELISA was used to measure VEGF secretion from cells into the cell medium.

Results : The number of viable cells incubated with 5.5mM glucose (physiological control) increased by 53.7% after 24 hours. In comparison, cells treated with 18.5mM glucose decreased by 2.8% while cells treated with 30mM glucose decreased by 20% after 24 hours of incubation. Cells without glucose treatment (0mM control) decreased by 33.3%. In contrast to the decrease of viable cell numbers after treatment with high glucose, there is an increase in VEGF secretion (pg/mL) to the cell medium with increase in glucose concentration from 5.5mM to 0, 18.5, and 30mM. The amount of VEGF secreted per cell also increased with increasing glucose concentrations.

Conclusions : Our results show that viability of retinal endothelial cells and VEGF release are highly responsive to changes in glucose concentration. Such glucose-induced changes in retinal endothelial cells may negatively impact the integrity of the microvasculature in the diabetic retina leading to angiogenesis and microaneursyms.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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