June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Adherence to diabetic eye examination guidelines in Australia – The National Eye Health Survey (NEHS)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jing Xie
    Department of Ophthalmology, Centre for Eye Research Australia, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Joshua Ross Foreman
    Department of Ophthalmology, Centre for Eye Research Australia, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Stuart Keel
    Department of Ophthalmology, Centre for Eye Research Australia, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Peter Van Wijngaarden
    Department of Ophthalmology, Centre for Eye Research Australia, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Hugh Taylor
    The University of Melbourne, 3Indigenous Eye Health Unit, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Mohamed Dirani
    Department of Ophthalmology, Centre for Eye Research Australia, East Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jing Xie, None; Joshua Foreman, None; Stuart Keel, None; Peter Wijngaarden, None; Hugh Taylor, None; Mohamed Dirani, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  The National Eye Health Survey was funded by the Department of Health of the Australian Government, and also received financial contributions from Novartis Australia and in-kind support from our industry and sector partners, OPSM, Carl Zeiss, Designs for Vision, the Royal Flying Doctor Service, Optometry Australia and the Brien Holden Vision Institute. We would like to specifically acknowledge OPSM, who kindly donated sunglasses valued at $130 for each study participant. The Centre for Eye Research Australia receives Operational Infrastructure Support from the Victorian Government. The Principal Investigator, Dr Mohamed Dirani, is supported by a NHMRC Career Development Fellowship (#1090466). The PhD student, Joshua Foreman is supported by an Australian Postgraduate Award scholarship.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 2895. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Jing Xie, Joshua Ross Foreman, Stuart Keel, Peter Van Wijngaarden, Hugh Taylor, Mohamed Dirani; Adherence to diabetic eye examination guidelines in Australia – The National Eye Health Survey (NEHS). Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):2895.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To determine the adherence to diabetic eye examination guidelines in Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians

Methods : Design: A cross-sectional survey using multi-stage, random cluster sampling.
Setting: Thirty randomly selected geographic sites in five Australian states and one Territory, stratified by remoteness.
Participants: 1738 Indigenous Australians aged 40-92 years and 3098 non-Indigenous Australians aged 50-98 years were recruited and examined between March 2015 and April 2016. Participants were examined using a standardised protocol that included a questionnaire (interviewer administered) a series of standardised eye tests.
Main outcome measures: National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) diabetic eye examination guidelines were used to determine adherence.

Results : Non-Indigenous Australians had a significantly higher adherence to screening recommendations (biennial screening) than Indigenous Australians (annual screening) (77.5% vs 52.7%, p <0.001). Factors associated with greater adherence were longer duration of diabetes in non-Indigenous Australians (OR 1.19 per five years, p=0.018) and male gender (OR 1.46, p=0.018) and residing in Inner Regional geographic areas (OR 1.66, p=0.007) in Indigenous Australians (OR=0.44, p=0.018). Older age was associate with poorer adherence in non-Indigenous Australians (OR 0.70 per decade, p=0.010).

Conclusions : More than three quarters of non-Indigenous Australians with diabetes and more than half of Indigenous Australians with diabetes adhere to the NHMRC eye examination guidelines. The discrepancy between adherence rates in Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities may point to a gap in the provision or uptake of screening services in Indigenous communities or a lack of awareness of the guidelines. A carefully integrated diabetic retinopathy screening service is required, particularly in remote areas, to improve adherence rates.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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