June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Evaluation of the effects of corrective strabismus surgery on social anxiety and self-consciousness in adults.
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kimberly Estes
    Ophthalmology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois, United States
  • Rebecca Parrish
    Ophthalmology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois, United States
  • James Sinacore
    Public Health Science, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois, United States
  • Patricia Mumby
    Psychiatry and Behavioral Neurosciences, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois, United States
  • James F McDonnell
    Ophthalmology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Kimberly Estes, None; Rebecca Parrish, None; James Sinacore, None; Patricia Mumby, None; James McDonnell, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  This work was supported by a grant from the Illinois Society for the Prevention of Blindness (ISPB), and funding from The Richard A. Perritt Charitable Foundation.​
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 2920. doi:
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      Kimberly Estes, Rebecca Parrish, James Sinacore, Patricia Mumby, James F McDonnell; Evaluation of the effects of corrective strabismus surgery on social anxiety and self-consciousness in adults.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):2920.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : A complete understanding of the psychosocial benefits strabismus surgery offers besides functional and cosmetic correction has yet to be fully determined. We performed a questionnaire based prospective study to evaluate the effect strabismus surgery had on private self-consciousness, public self-consciousness and social anxiety using the self-consciousness scale (SCS) developed by Scheier & Carver in 1985.

Methods : 95 English speaking adult patients who were candidates for surgical correction of strabismus elected to participate in this study. Patients were eligible to participate if they were age >18 years old and able to read and complete the study questionnaires. Patients’ completed a demographics and a self-consciousness scale form both pre- and post-operatively. The self-consciousness scale was rated on a Likert-type rating scale ranging from 0 to 3 (e.g. 0 = ”not at all like me”, 3 = ”a lot like me”). The total and subscale (private self-consciousness, public self-consciousness, and social anxiety) summative scores were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test with statistically significant relationships defined as p<0.05.

Results : Preliminary data indicated an overall improvement post-operatively in total scores (-2.517 p=0.012), public self-consciousness scores (-2.628, p=0.009,) and social anxiety (-2.202, p=0.028). While improvement in scores was noted in private self-consciousness scores (-1.136 p=0.188), significance was not achieved for this subscale.

Conclusions : This study suggests that beyond functional and cosmetic improvements, strabismus surgery can result in a statistically significant improvement in measures of public self-consciousness and social anxiety.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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