June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Progression time to foveal loss in Geographic Atrophy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Johanna Maria Colijn
    Ophthalmology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands
    Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  • Corina Brussee
    Ophthalmology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands
    Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  • Ada J Hooghart
    Ophthalmology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands
    Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  • Magda A. Meester
    Ophthalmology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands
    Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  • Johannes R Vingerling
    Ophthalmology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  • Albert Hofman
    Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, Rotterdam, Netherlands
  • Caroline Klaver
    Ophthalmology Epidemiology, Erasmus MC, Den Haag, Netherlands
    Ophthalmology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, Netherlands
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Johanna Maria Colijn, None; Corina Brussee, None; Ada Hooghart, None; Magda Meester, None; Johannes Vingerling, None; Albert Hofman, None; Caroline Klaver, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 2980. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Johanna Maria Colijn, Corina Brussee, Ada J Hooghart, Magda A. Meester, Johannes R Vingerling, Albert Hofman, Caroline Klaver; Progression time to foveal loss in Geographic Atrophy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):2980.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Geographic Atrophy (GA) is a prominent end stage of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) for which novel therapies are under development to reduce progression. We studied the long-term progression of GA and its relation to foveal involvement in a natural history study of non-selected cases.

Methods : The study population consisted of 62 eyes who had or developed GA in Rotterdam Study I, a population based prospective cohort which started in 1990 and which had follow up visits every five years. The location and surface area of GA was graded on fundus photographs and auto fluorescent images at every visit. We calculated the time until loss of RPE reached the fovea.

Results : Of the 62 eyes with GA and follow-up (range 1-12 years), 16 eyes had incident GA. At first presentation, 13 incident GA eyes had foveal sparing, and 3 eyes already had foveal involvement. Three eyes developed loss of RPE in the fovea during follow up. The average time until GA reached the fovea was 6.9 (SD 4.7) years. Of eyes (N=14) with prevalent non-foveal GA, time until foveal involvement was 5.5 years (SD 3.9). Most eyes (31/38) with foveal GA were visually impaired according to WHO definitions; this was not the case for non-foveal GA (9/22, p=0.001).

Conclusions : The first presentation of GA is mostly outside of the fovea, and the average time to reach the fovea is 5.8 years in persons who live long enough. Future trials for GA which aim to reduce the risk of foveal involvement should realize that this clinical endpoint takes a rather long time to develop.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×