June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Primate macula and short wavelength cones use glycolysis to fund energy expenditure
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jaimie Hoh Kam
    Visual Neuroscience, Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom
  • Tobias Weinrich Weinrich
    Visual Neuroscience, Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom
  • Michael B. Powner
    Visual Neuroscience, Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom
  • Glen Jeffery
    Visual Neuroscience, Institute of Ophthalmology, London, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jaimie Hoh Kam, None; Tobias Weinrich Weinrich, None; Michael Powner, None; Glen Jeffery, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  BBSRC BB/N000250/1
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 3015. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Jaimie Hoh Kam, Tobias Weinrich Weinrich, Michael B. Powner, Glen Jeffery; Primate macula and short wavelength cones use glycolysis to fund energy expenditure
      . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):3015.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : The retina has the greatest metabolic demand in the body and ageing and disease impact on its central region, which has a distinct architecture and very high cell density. Here we ask how the primate retina and RPE derive energy for cellular function.

Methods : We use eyes from 10 cynomolgous long-tailed monkeys (Macaca fascicularis) which were donated at death and were between 4 and 14 years old. Mitochondrial function and glycolysis were analysed using Western blot and immunohistochemistry of different subunits of cytochrome C oxidase and lactate and pyruvate dehydrogenases.

Results : Mitochondrial function was assessed by analysis of COX I, II, III and IV, revealing consistent patterns across the neural retina and RPE. However, the central retina also draws on glycolysis as an energy source shown by the differential presence of lactate dehydrogenase and pyruvate dehydrogenase specifically expressed in the macular. Further, short wavelength sensitive cones (S-cones) may use glycolysis as their main energy source across the retina as they only express lactate dehydrogenase and not pyruvate dehydrogenase. This explains their distinct psychophysical characteristics which saturate prematurely compare to medium and long wavelength sensitive cones. That S-cones use glycolysis is reinforced by their reduced function in diabetes where declining insulin levels will restrict S-cones access to glucose.

Conclusions : Methylglyoxal is a byproduct of glycolysis and this can promote advanced glycation end-products which are toxic. This process may contribute to age related attrition in the central retina and reduced S-cone function in ageing.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×