June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Inflammatory mediator uptake and release in contact lens materials - a preliminary experimental report
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cecilia Chao
    Optometry, SUNY, New York, New York, United States
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, UNSW, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
  • Kathryn Richdale
    Optometry, SUNY, New York, New York, United States
  • Mark D P Willcox
    School of Optometry and Vision Science, UNSW, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
    Optometry, SUNY, New York, New York, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Cecilia Chao, None; Kathryn Richdale, None; Mark Willcox, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 3063. doi:
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      Cecilia Chao, Kathryn Richdale, Mark D P Willcox; Inflammatory mediator uptake and release in contact lens materials - a preliminary experimental report. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):3063.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The rate of corneal infiltrative events during silicone hydrogel lens wear is approximately double that of traditional hydrogel lenses. It is not known why this is, but it may be related to adsorption of inflammatory mediators into or onto the silicone hydrogel lenses. This pilot experiment aimed to dertermine if certain mediators could be taken up and released by such contact lenses.

Methods : Comfilcon A (Biofinity, silicone hydrogel, low water, non-ionic) and Omafilcon A (Proclear, hydrogel, high water, non-ionic) were used. Contact lenses were removed from the package and rinsed with PBS (pH 7.2) before soaking in 500 or 100pg/ml of IL-8 (MWt = 11 kDa; pI = 9.1), IL-10 (21 kDa; pI 8.21) and MMP-9 (78 kDa; pI 5.69), or pooled basal tears (CC, KR) for 24 hours at ambient temperature. Lenses were then extracted in 1:1 2% trifluoroacetic acid: acetonitrile for 24 hours at ambient temperature. The extractant was freeze-dried and reconstituted. The concentrations in the extractions were determined using enzyme-linked immuno-assays.

Results : When incubated in 500pg/ml of IL-8, there was markedly more IL-8 released from Comfilcon A vs. Omafilcon A lenses (131 vs 43pg/ml). However, when incubated in tears, less IL-8 was released from Comfilcon A (28pg/ml vs 69pg/ml).When incubated in 100pg/ml of IL-10 or MMP-9, less than 2pg/ml difference was found between materials (IL-10: both 34pg/ml; MMP-9: 0 in ComfilconA and 1.5pg/ml in OmafilconA). When incubated in 500pg/ml, there was approximately 6pg/ml greater released from ComfilconA compared to OmafilconA for both IL-10 (43 vs 36pg/ml) and MMP-9 (36 vs 29pg/ml). For tears, there was also no difference in released concentration of IL-10 (both 34pg/ml) or MMP-9 (both 0pg/ml) from either material.

Conclusions : The uptake and release of proteins from contact lenses is influenced by their charge and size, and material properties of lenses. IL-8 is smaller and more positively charged at pH 7.2 than either IL-10 or MMP-9 and these may have influenced release after absorption from pure solutions. However, data from soaking lenses in tears demonstrate that other substances may influence the uptake and/or release from lenses.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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