June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Correlation between Ocular Surface Temperature and Tear Film Stability in Soft Contact Lens Wear
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • takashi itokawa
    ophthalmology, Toho University Omiru Medical Center, Yokohama, Japan
  • Yuichi Hori
    ophthalmology, Toho University Omiru Medical Center, Yokohama, Japan
  • YUKINOBU OKAJIMA
    ophthalmology, Toho University Omiru Medical Center, Yokohama, Japan
  • Hiroko Iwashita
    ophthalmology, Toho University Omiru Medical Center, Yokohama, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   takashi itokawa, None; Yuichi Hori, Alcon (F), HOYA (F), KOWA (F), Novartis (F), Otsuka (F), Otsuka (C), Santen (C), Santen (F), Senju (F); YUKINOBU OKAJIMA, None; Hiroko Iwashita, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 3092. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      takashi itokawa, Yuichi Hori, YUKINOBU OKAJIMA, Hiroko Iwashita; Correlation between Ocular Surface Temperature and Tear Film Stability in Soft Contact Lens Wear. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):3092.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Changes in ocular surface temperature (OST) in dry eye with the eyes open are higher than in normal eyes because of the tear film instability in dry eye. We hypothesized that the changes in OST in soft contact lens (SCL) wear also might be higher than without SCL wear. We measured the changes in the OST over SCLs and evaluated the correlations between the changes in OST and non-invasive tear break-up time (NIBUT) in SCL wearers.

Methods : Twenty eyes of 20 normal contact lens wearers (mean age, 24.4 ± 4.1 years) were enrolled. Four different types of SCLs (silicone hydrogel, polyvinyl pyrrolidone [PVP] hydrogel, hydrogel, and hydroxyethyl methacrylate [HEMA]) were used. An ocular surface thermographer (TG-1000, TOMEY Corporation) measured the OST for 10 seconds immediately after eye opening. We defined the difference from 0 to 10 seconds as the ΔOST. The NIBUT over the SCL was measured by tear film interferometry (DR-1 alpha, KOWA). The tear interference patterns on the contact lens (TIPCL) were classified into five grades by tear film interferometry. The correlations between the ΔOST and NIBUT and TIPCL were determined.

Results :
The ΔOST was correlated significantly with the NIBUT with (r=0.642, P<0.0001, Spearman) and without (r=0.411, P<0.01) a SCL. With the OST decrease over 10 seconds, the TIPCL grade increased significantly (r=-0.636, P<0.0001). The differences in the ΔOST between with and without silicone hydrogel, hydrogel with PVP, hydrogel, and HEMA SCLs were 0.15±0.33, 0.22±0.33, 0.46±0.33, and 0.50±0.35oC, respectively. The difference in the ΔOST between with and without silicone hydrogel SCLs was significantly smaller than with hydrogel and HEMA SCLs (P<0.05, P<0.01, respectively, Tukey HSD). The differences in the NIBUTs between with and without each SCL were 2.6±2.6, 2.3±3.6, 5.3±3.2, and 4.8±2.8 seconds, respectively. The differences in the NIBUTs with silicone hydrogel and hydrogel with PVP SCLs were significantly (P<0.05 for both comparisons) smaller than with hydrogel lens.

Conclusions : Measurements of the OST over SCLs can be used to evaluate tear film stability and contact lens fitting for contact lens wearers.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×