June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
The Histopathology and the Pathogenesis of Floppy Eyelid Syndrome
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Henry Chen
    Ophthalmology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • Seymour Brownstein
    Ophthalmology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
    Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • David Ronald Jordan
    Ophthalmology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • Michel J Belliveau
    Ophthalmology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • Steven Gilberg
    Ophthalmology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • Codrin Iacob
    Pathology, New York Eye and Ear Infirmary, New York, New York, United States
  • Paula Blanco
    Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • James Farmer
    Pathology & Laboratory Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Henry Chen, None; Seymour Brownstein, None; David Jordan, None; Michel Belliveau, None; Steven Gilberg, None; Codrin Iacob, None; Paula Blanco, None; James Farmer, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 3347. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Henry Chen, Seymour Brownstein, David Ronald Jordan, Michel J Belliveau, Steven Gilberg, Codrin Iacob, Paula Blanco, James Farmer; The Histopathology and the Pathogenesis of Floppy Eyelid Syndrome. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):3347.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Floppy eyelid syndrome (FES) is an uncommon, but distressing condition, characterized by a constellation of symptoms and signs that include an easily everted upper eyelid, papillary conjunctivitis, nonspecific ocular irritation, and a rubbery, malleable eyelid. The pathogenesis of FES has not been fully elucidated. We performed an observational case series to further explore the pathogenesis of FES by studying the degree of association of adipose tissue accumulation, loss of elastic tissue, and scarring in the tarsus.

Methods : Twenty specimens of FES were obtained from the Ocular Pathology Registry of the University of Ottawa Sections from each formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimen were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, periodic acid-schiff stain, Masson’s trichrome, Verhoeff-Van Gieson elastica, and S100. Each slide was analyzed by light microscopy. Scores of 0 to 4+ were assigned for the number of adipocytes, amount of elastic tissue, and degree of fibrovascular scarring in the tarsus. In each specimen, the number of adipocytes can readily be counted, while the degree of changes in the elastic tissue and amount of fibrovascular scarring were compared to selected test slides. Specimens of eyelids with a normal tarsus served as controls. Furthermore, we evaluated the impact of age and gender on our results in both groups of patients.

Results : The number of adipocytes was significantly higher for the FES specimens compared to the controls (p <0.05). The amount of elastic tissue in the FES specimens were significantly lower and found to be mainly present around the Meibomian glands. There was increased fibrovascular scarring within the tarsus in the FES specimens compared to the controls.

Conclusions : Our study documents the presence of increased adipocytes, decreased elastic tissue, and the presence of fibrovascular scarring and their potential role in the pathogenesis of FES. Our results further characterizes the pathological processes involved in FES.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×