June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Hyperbaric Therapy for Central Retinal Artery Occlusion: Is It Really Worth It? A Cost Benefit Analysis

Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paymohn Mahdavi
    Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, New York, New York, United States
  • Brett P Bielory
    Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, New York, New York, United States
  • Robert G Josephberg
    Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, New York, New York, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Paymohn Mahdavi, None; Brett Bielory, None; Robert Josephberg, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 3647. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Paymohn Mahdavi, Brett P Bielory, Robert G Josephberg; Hyperbaric Therapy for Central Retinal Artery Occlusion: Is It Really Worth It? A Cost Benefit Analysis

      . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):3647.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : To study the influence of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) for central retinal artery occlusion (CRAO), specifically cost-benefit analysis, quality of life improvement and healthcare associated roadblocks.

Methods : Four subjects with CRAO treated with HBOT at Westchester Medical Center between 2012 and 2015 were identified. Variables investigated included time of onset of symptoms to time of arrival, Door-To-Chamber (DTC) time, number of treatments, visual acuity, average cost of treatment and average hospital stay.

Results : 50% of patients who underwent treatment had no improvement in visual acuity while 50% had limited recovery. 100% of patients (4/4) reported no improvement in quality of life. Average time to presentation was 11.85 hours (711 minutes). Average DTC was 8.25 hours (495 minutes). Average total cost including treatment and hospital stay was $17,826/patient.

Conclusions : Poor cost-to-benefit ratio and a strain on hospital resources make HBOT an inadequate treatment modality for CRAO.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×