June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
In Vivo Molecular Imaging of Retinal Hypoxia in a Mouse Model of Laser-induced Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Md Imam Uddin
    Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Ashwath Jayagopal
    Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd, Basel, Switzerland
  • Gary W. McCollum
    Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • John S Penn
    Ophthalmology, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Md Imam Uddin, None; Ashwath Jayagopal, None; Gary McCollum, None; John Penn, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Knights Templar Eye Foundation career starter grant 2016-2017.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 3665. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Md Imam Uddin, Ashwath Jayagopal, Gary W. McCollum, John S Penn; In Vivo Molecular Imaging of Retinal Hypoxia in a Mouse Model of Laser-induced Retinal Vein Occlusion (RVO). Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):3665.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : To demonstrate the utility of a new in vivo molecular imaging probe, HYPOX-4, for early detection of retinal hypoxia in a mouse model of retinal vein occlusion (RVO). This method will assist early detection of retinal hypoxia in real time and will facilitate studying the pathogenesis of RVO.

Methods : Induction of RVO was achieved in mice using photodynamic retinal vein thrombosis (PRVT) of major retinal vein(s) close to the optic disk. In vivo imaging of the retinal hypoxia was performed using a new molecular imaging probe, HYPOX-4, that was developed by our laboratory. Pimonidazole-adduct immunostaining was used as an ex vivo method for detecting retinal hypoxia in RVO mice. Retinal vasculature was imaged using fluorescein angiography (FA) and IB4 staining. Retinal tissue morphology was assessed using spectral domain OCT (SD-OCT).

Results : Within a few hours of post-PRVT in mice, we observed significant changes in retinal hypoxia as determined by the pimonidazole-adduct immunostaining method. This method also showed that the extent of retinal hypoxia depends on the number of retinal veins occluded. After photocoagulation, the occluded veins reopened within one week as determined by FA, and neovascularization (NV) was observed at 10-14 days post-PRVT. HYPOX-4-dependent in vivo imaging showed retinal hypoxia in RVO mice during this period. This study provides the first qualitative and quantitative evidence of retinal hypoxia in RVO mice at early stages of vein occlusion.

Conclusions : This study demonstrated the utility of a new hypoxia sensitive molecular imaging probe, HYPOX-4, in RVO mice at an early stage before the onset of NV. HYPOX-4 could be a powerful predictive biomarker for the retinal NV that occurs in RVO and other vasculopathies. This study showed acute changes in retinal oxygen tension precede and may initiate vascular complications including NV in RVO mice.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×