June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Understanding Patient Understanding: Differences in Patient Self-Reported Compliance in a Resident-Run Glaucoma Clinic
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Bilal Yousufzai
    Ophthalmology, Georgetown University, Falls Church, Virginia, United States
  • Alice Gasch
    Ophthalmology, Georgetown University, Falls Church, Virginia, United States
  • Rosan Choi
    Ophthalmology, Georgetown University, Falls Church, Virginia, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Bilal Yousufzai, None; Alice Gasch, None; Rosan Choi, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 3728. doi:
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      Bilal Yousufzai, Alice Gasch, Rosan Choi; Understanding Patient Understanding: Differences in Patient Self-Reported Compliance in a Resident-Run Glaucoma Clinic. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):3728.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To determine the rate of patients’ self-reported compliance and associated behaviors in an attending-supervised, resident-directed urban multi-specialty, hospital-based Glaucoma clinic.

Methods : A 25-question survey of dichotomous and multiple-choice with free response questions was created and distributed between June 2015 and February 2016 by patients seen in the resident-run glaucoma clinic and completed voluntarily under IRB standards. All surveys were received during the respondent’s clinic visit.

Results : 202 surveys were received. 49% missed a dose, and 49% did not miss a dose. 35% of all patients had previously received written instructions. 37% learned about glaucoma by reading literature, and 17.8% learned about glaucoma from their doctors. Of the self-reported compliance group, 21.12% did miss a dose and took it later that day but did not miss a dose for the day, and 68.75% reported they forget to use their drops.

Conclusions : Patients may have different perceptions on self-reported compliance. Further understanding patients’ behaviors with regard to their treatment regimen and how patients best learn about their disease process may help physicians educate all patients on how to achieve higher compliance in the management of chronic disease.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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