June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Engineering of a curved corneal stromal substitute
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Noémie Parent
    Department of Ophtalmology, Université Laval, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
    Centre CUO-LOEX, Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
  • Julie Bérubé
    Department of Ophtalmology, Université Laval, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
    Centre CUO-LOEX, Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
  • Jean-Michel Bourget
    Functional Nanomaterials Group Leader Life Sciences Division, National Research Council of Canada, Boucherville, Quebec, Canada
  • Maxence Mounier
    Functional Nanomaterials Group Leader Life Sciences Division, National Research Council of Canada, Boucherville, Quebec, Canada
  • Teodor Veres
    Functional Nanomaterials Group Leader Life Sciences Division, National Research Council of Canada, Boucherville, Quebec, Canada
  • Stephanie Proulx
    Department of Ophtalmology, Université Laval, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
    Centre CUO-LOEX, Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Quebec, Quebec, Canada
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Noémie Parent, None; Julie Bérubé, None; Jean-Michel Bourget, None; Maxence Mounier, None; Teodor Veres, None; Stephanie Proulx, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  NSERC, CIHR, VHRN, FRQS-FAT, TheCell, Université Laval
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 3911. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Noémie Parent, Julie Bérubé, Jean-Michel Bourget, Maxence Mounier, Teodor Veres, Stephanie Proulx; Engineering of a curved corneal stromal substitute. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):3911.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : The self-assembly approach of tissue engineering allows to reconstruct 3D corneal stromal substitutes (Proulx et al., 2009; Bourget et al., 2016). Presently, these substitutes are flat. The purpose of this study was to engineer a stromal substitute with the curved shape of a native cornea.

Methods : Curved plastics were formed using a thermoplastic elastomer (TPE) and sterilized. Their size fitted into a well of 6-well plates. Keratocytes, previoulsy isolated from a human cornea, were seeded on top of the TPE and cultured in the presence of serum and ascorbic acid. Flat 6-well culture plates were used as controls. Cells were cultured for 35 days and formed sheets of extracellular matrix. Two sheets were superposed to form a thicker stromal substitute, and cultured to allow for the sheets to adhere to each other (14 days for curved stromal substitutes; 8 days for flat stromal substitutes). The stromal substitutes were then characterized using macroscopic images. They were then fixed in 3.7% formaldehyde for histology (Masson’s Trichrome staining).

Results : The activated keratocytes secreted extracellular matrix and formed sheets on both the curved TPE and the flat plastic controls. When removed from the curved TPE surface, the stromal substitute maintained a more pronounced curved form. Thickness of the stromal substitutes were calculated using histology cross-sections. The curved stromal subsitutes had a mean thickness of 26.1±0.5µm (n=2 counts) and flat stromal subsitutes 15.4±2.7µm (n=3 counts).

Conclusions : This study demonstrates that the self-assembly approach can be used to reconstruct curved stromal substitute. Therefore, this brings us closer to a reconstructed cornea whose properties are similar to the native tissue.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×