June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Clinicopathologic Correlation of Secondary Corneal Amyloid Deposition
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark P. Ghassibi
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Maria P Fernandez
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Eduardo C Alfonso
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Richard K. Forster
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Sander R Dubovy
    Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Mark Ghassibi, None; Maria Fernandez, None; Eduardo Alfonso, None; Richard Forster, None; Sander Dubovy, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Supported by NIH Center Core Grant P30EY014801, Research to Prevent Blindness Unrestricted Grant, Department of Defense (DOD- Grant#W81XWH-09-1-0675 and Grant# W81XWH-13-1-0048 ONOVA), and Florida Lions Eye Bank.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 3915. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Mark P. Ghassibi, Maria P Fernandez, Eduardo C Alfonso, Richard K. Forster, Sander R Dubovy; Clinicopathologic Correlation of Secondary Corneal Amyloid Deposition. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):3915.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To report the clinicopathologic findings of 26 cases with secondary amyloid deposition of the cornea.

Methods : In a non-comparative, consecutive case series, the database of the Florida Lions Ocular Pathology Laboratory was searched for surgical specimens diagnosed with secondary corneal amyloid deposition on light microscopic examination from the time period of 1998 to 2016. The specimens were reviewed and the clinicopathologic features were evaluated.

Results : The diagnosis of secondary amyloid deposition was established by light microscopic examination of formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue in the corneas of 26 eyes (Right = 13, Left = 13). From this group of 26 patients, 13 were female and 13 male. Mean age was 53±22 (range, 9-83) years. Findings on clinical presentation were keratoconus (7), keratoglobus (1), corneal opacification and/or scarring associated with trauma (5), Cogan syndrome (1), Peters anomaly (1), interstitial keratitis (2), Fuchs endothelial dystrophy (1), failed corneal graft (1), band keratopathy (1), bullous keratopathy (3), and congenital cataract/glaucoma (3). Twenty-one patients underwent penetrating keratoplasty (PK), 3 underwent enucleation, 1 underwent evisceration, and 1 underwent superficial corneal scraping. On histopathologic examination all eyes demonstrated a Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS)-positive acellular material within the corneal stroma that stained positively for Congo Red-stain and demonstrated apple-green birefringence under polarized light within the amorphous tissue.

Conclusions : We present the largest case series with clinicopathologic examination of secondary corneal amyloidosis. All cases demonstrated PAS- and Congo red-positive acellular material within the corneal stroma and exhibited apple-green birefringence under polarized light. All the cases of corneal amyloid deposition were secondary to chronic ocular surface inflammation, corneal degeneration, or trauma.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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