June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Deficient Contrast Sensitivity Function in Regular Astigmatic Eyes with Normal or Corrected-to-Normal Visual Acuity
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jinrong Li
    State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
  • Jin Yuan
    State Key Laboratory of Ophthalmology, Guangdong Provincial Key Lab of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
  • Fang Hou
    School of Ophthalmology & Optometry and Eye Hospital, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang, China
  • Michael Dorr
    Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany
  • Zhong-lin Lu
    Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jinrong Li, None; Jin Yuan, None; Fang Hou, None; Michael Dorr, Adaptive Sensory Technology (I), Adaptive Sensory Technology (P); Zhong-lin Lu, Adaptive Sensory Technology (I), Adaptive Sensory Technology (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support  This research was supported by the National Eye Institute (EY021553) to Zhong-lin Lu,Young Teacher Training Project of Sun Yat-sen University to Jinrong Li and Grant from Wenzhou Medical University (QTJ16006) to Fang Hou
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 4214. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Jinrong Li, Jin Yuan, Fang Hou, Michael Dorr, Zhong-lin Lu; Deficient Contrast Sensitivity Function in Regular Astigmatic Eyes with Normal or Corrected-to-Normal Visual Acuity. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):4214.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : The contrast sensitivity function (CSF) provides a more comprehensive measure in functional vision compared to visual acuity. This study investigates the visual quality of regular astigmatic subjects with normal or corrected-to-normal visual acuity by evaluating their CSF and ocular optical performance.

Methods : A total of 40 eyes of patients (ages 15-29 years old) with regular astigmatism either with normal acuity or corrected-to-normal acuity with their full spectacle corrections, and 34 healthy eyes of individuals (ages 22-30 years old) without astigmatism participated in this study. The cutoff spatial frequency (cutoff SF) and the area under log CSF (AULCSF) in CSF were derived with the quick CSF method (Lesmes, et al, 2010; Hou, et al, 2015). The MTF cutoff frequency (MTFcutoff), Strehl2D ratio, OQAS values (OVs) at 100%, 20%, and 9% contrasts, and objective scatter index (OSI) were used to assess the optical quality of the studied eyes by the Optical Quality Analysis System (OQAS).

Results : The average astigmatism was 2.56±0.84 D (1.50-4.50 D) in the astigmatic eyes. The MTFcutoff (29.28±15.55 c/d) of the astigmatic eyes was significantly lower than that of the normal eyes (40.48±11.68 c/d) (p<0.001). The Strehl2D ratio was less in astigmatic eyes (0.18±0.09) than that of the normal eyes (0.23±0.08) (p<0.01). OV 100%, 20% and 9% and OSI were significantly smaller in the astigmatic eyes compared to normal (all p<0.05). Moreover, the cutoff SF in the astigmatic eyes was significantly lower (14.36±4.32 c/d) than that in the normal eyes (17.82±5.48 c/d) (p < 0.001). The AULCSF was reduced in astigmatic (1.15±0.28) versus normal eyes (1.35±0.17) (p<0.01). Most importantly, for patients with regular astigmatism, although visual acuity was not correlated with any optical performance measure, the AULCSF negatively correlated with the degree of astigmatism and the Strehl2D ratio (r=-0.3223 and -0.3745; p<0.05), and the cutoff SF correlated with the degree of astigmatism (r=0.3553; p<0.05).

Conclusions : Astigmatic eyes exhibited deficient contrast sensitivity function and optical transmission, even under full optical correction. The contrast sensitivity function is an important clinical management factor in assessing astigmatism correction in addition to visual acuity, even for individuals with normal uncorrected visual acuity.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×