June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Characteristics of a low vision glaucoma population
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Wall
    Hoover Low Vision Rehabilitation Servies, Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
    Krieger Eye Institute, Sinai Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Michelle Bianchi
    Hoover Low Vision Rehabilitation Servies, Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Janet S Sunness
    Hoover Low Vision Rehabilitation Servies, Greater Baltimore Medical Center, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
    Ophth and Vis Sci, Univ of Maryland Sch of Med, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jennifer Wall, None; Michelle Bianchi, None; Janet Sunness, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 4661. doi:
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      Jennifer Wall, Michelle Bianchi, Janet S Sunness; Characteristics of a low vision glaucoma population. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):4661.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Patients with low vision due to glaucoma have more difficulty performing daily activities, are at greater risk for injury, and suffer higher rates of depression, but these issues have not been adequately characterized. We performed a retrospective analysis of patients with a primary diagnosis of glaucoma presenting to a low vision clinic in order to describe their characteristics.

Methods : All patients with a primary diagnosis of glaucoma who presented to Hoover Low Vision Rehabilitation Services from August 2012 through September 2016 were included. Data collected included patient’s age, visual acuity, Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity, visual field measures, and difficulty of various activities, including reading, watching TV, driving, ambulating, recognizing faces, and using a computer. Patients were also asked about depression and visual hallucinations. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed.

Results : Patient ages ranged from 22 to 103, with a mean of 77 years; only 13% were under 60 years of age. Visual acuity in the better-seeing eye ranged from 20/20 to worse than 20/400, with a median of 20/40. 54% of patients had visual acuity of 20/40 or better. However, 61% needed 4 times as much contrast as normal on the Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity chart. Humphrey Visual Field (HVF) 24-2 available in 68 patients gave a median value of the mean deviation of -14.36 dB. Of 83 patients queried, 36% reported depression and 24% reported visual hallucinations. Of 85 patients who were drivers, 78% had stopped driving due to their vision. Of the 41 patients who used computers, 56% reported difficulty. Percentages of patients who reported difficulty with other tasks included 60% recognizing faces, 85% reading, 44% watching TV, and 66% mobility. Correlation between logMAR visual acuity and Pelli-Robson contrast sensitivity was -0.64, contrast sensitivity and HVF mean deviation was -0.24, and logMAR visual acuity and HVF mean deviation was -0.11.

Conclusions : This study quantifies the visual difficulties of glaucoma patients in a low vision setting. This information will give low vision providers a better understanding of this population’s unique needs and thus help patients achieve more independence in their daily life.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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