June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Simulation of panretinal laser photocoagulation based on the photoreceptor densities
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kentaro Nishida
    Ophthalmology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan
  • Ken Miura
    Ophthalmology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan
  • Hirokazu Sakaguchi
    Ophthalmology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan
  • Kohji Nishida
    Ophthalmology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka, Japan
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Kentaro Nishida, None; Ken Miura, None; Hirokazu Sakaguchi, None; Kohji Nishida, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  This work was supported by Manpei Suzuki Diabetes Foundation.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 5038. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Kentaro Nishida, Ken Miura, Hirokazu Sakaguchi, Kohji Nishida; Simulation of panretinal laser photocoagulation based on the photoreceptor densities. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):5038.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The purpose of panretinal laser photocoagulation (PRP) is the destruction of high oxygen-consuming tissue such as photoreceptors, and the effect of retinal photocoagulation on that photocoagulated area could be changed when applied to different sites. We aimed to evaluate the effect of photoreceptor density on PRP.

Methods : We constructed 3D photoreceptor distribution using photoreceptor density data derived from a previous study that used 3D CAD software (Solid Works®), and calculated the number of photoreceptors destroyed by both scattered and full-scattered PRP (400 μm on the retina, spot spacing 1.0). Thereafter, we simulated PRP using previously reported geometrical methods (EJO2016).

Results : The total photocoagulated areas using scattered and full-scattered PRP were 153.6 and 228.0 mm2, respectively. The total numbers of photoreceptors destroyed by scattered and full-scattered PRP were 16,240,000 and 24,580,000, respectively.

Conclusions : If the purpose of PRP is the destruction of photoreceptors, the effect of scattered PRP is expected to be two-thirds that of fully scattered PRP.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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