June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Development of an open-source pupilometer for testing melanopsin responses
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jesse Gale
    University of Otago, Wellington, New Zealand
  • Elf Eldridge
    School of Engineering and Computer Science, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
  • Shaetrun Pathmanathan
    School of Engineering and Computer Science, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
  • Kapeteni Polutea
    School of Engineering and Computer Science, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
  • Gideon Gouws
    School of Engineering and Computer Science, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand
  • Simon Fraser
    School of Design, Victoria University of Wellington , Wellington, New Zealand
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Jesse Gale, None; Elf Eldridge, None; Shaetrun Pathmanathan, None; Kapeteni Polutea, None; Gideon Gouws, None; Simon Fraser, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  Capital Vision Research Trust - summer student funding
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 5090. doi:
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      Jesse Gale, Elf Eldridge, Shaetrun Pathmanathan, Kapeteni Polutea, Gideon Gouws, Simon Fraser; Development of an open-source pupilometer for testing melanopsin responses. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):5090.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : The intrinsically-photosensitive melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells are of interest for many reasons. Quantifying melanopsin function with the post-illumination pupil response (PIPR) is of potential use in clinical research, but devices to test this response are expensive and are not portable. We aimed to develop a cheap and portable open-source pupilometer with the capacity to measure PIPR.

Methods : A pupil measurement device was developed using widely available low cost componentry based on a Raspberry Pi microprocessor platform and infra-red camera. The design, software, and early findings were made freely available on an open source directory.

Results : A portable 3D-printed goggle-shaped design was developed, that could be replicated anywhere worldwide for less than $200, including optics, electronics, and colour filters. Infrared video of the pupil was obtained and automated real time pupil size analysis was developed based on previously published techniques. Multicolour light-emitting diodes of variable intensity were used to stimulate pupil responses, offering illuminance in the blue channel up to 200 cd/m^2. The PIPR was measured and quantified in normal volunteers.

Conclusions : The proliferation of cheap components, powerful and versatile microprocessors, and 3D printers enables the development of new clinical and research tools at low cost.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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