June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
The Effects of Atropine on the Development of Binocular and Monocular Lens-Induced Myopia in Marmosets
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alexandra Benavente-Perez
    Biological Sciences, SUNY College of Optometry, New York, New York, United States
  • Ann Nour
    Biological Sciences, SUNY College of Optometry, New York, New York, United States
  • Tobin Ansel
    Biological Sciences, SUNY College of Optometry, New York, New York, United States
  • Xiaoying Zhu
    Biological Sciences, SUNY College of Optometry, New York, New York, United States
  • Rita Nieu
    Biological Sciences, SUNY College of Optometry, New York, New York, United States
  • Harrison Feng
    Biological Sciences, SUNY College of Optometry, New York, New York, United States
  • Xu Cheng
    Johnson and Johnson Vision Care, Inc., Jacksonville , Florida, United States
  • Noel A Brennan
    Johnson and Johnson Vision Care, Inc., Jacksonville , Florida, United States
  • David Troilo
    Biological Sciences, SUNY College of Optometry, New York, New York, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Alexandra Benavente-Perez, Johnson and Johnson Vision Care, Inc. (F); Ann Nour, Johnson and Johnson Vision Care, Inc. (F); Tobin Ansel, None; Xiaoying Zhu, None; Rita Nieu, None; Harrison Feng, None; Xu Cheng, Johnson and Johnson Vision Care, Inc (E); Noel Brennan, Johnson and Johnson Vision Care, Inc (E); David Troilo, Johnson and Johnson Vision Care, Inc (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support  Johnson and Johnson Vision Care, Inc.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 5466. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Alexandra Benavente-Perez, Ann Nour, Tobin Ansel, Xiaoying Zhu, Rita Nieu, Harrison Feng, Xu Cheng, Noel A Brennan, David Troilo; The Effects of Atropine on the Development of Binocular and Monocular Lens-Induced Myopia in Marmosets. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):5466.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : Topical low-dose atropine has been identified as a possible drug treatment to reduce myopia progression in children, although there remain questions about the dosing and mechanisms of action. In this study we present preliminary evidence of atropine effects on the development of experimental myopia in marmosets.

Methods : Marmosets wore -5D single vision soft contact lenses either binocularly (n=15) or monoculary (OD -5D, OS plano, n=7) from 70 days of age for 10 weeks while being treated monocularly on the right eye with 1%, 0.1%, or 0.005% atropine (vehicle drops on left eyes). On-axis vitreous chamber depth (VC) and refractive state (Rx) were measured and compared interocularly, and also to monocularly treated -5D marmosets without atropine (n=8) and untreated marmosets (n=14).

Results :
Rearing marmosets with binocular -5D contact lenses induced significantly greater Rx and VC compensatory changes than treating them monoculary (overall Rx and VC change on treated eyes at the end of treatment, mean±SE: binocular group –6.76±1.50D, 0.85±0.13mm; monocular group -2.93±1.56D, 0.65±0.10mm, p<0.001). Atropine 1% effectively eliminated the response to monocular -5D lenses seen in non-atropine treated marmosets. Unlike the significant induced axial myopia seen in non-atropine eyes (interocular VC difference: 0.13±0.05mm, Rx difference: –2.81±0.74D, p<0.05), there were no interocular differences in VC or Rx at any ages tested in atropine treated marmosets (Repeated ANOVA Rx, p=0.23; VC p=0.35). However, low dose atropine (0.005% and 0.01%) was ineffective in reducing axial myopia in the binocular -5D lens reared marmosets (overall VC change at the end of treatment for 0.01% atropine; OD:0.85±0.05mm, OS:0.87±0.04mm, p=0.68; 0.005% atropine; OD: 0.84±0.05mm, OS:0.81±0.04mm, p=0.30)

Conclusions : The compensatory response to imposed hyperopic defocus is greater in binocularly treated marmosets suggesting interocular interactions in the visual control of emmetropization. Atropine at higher doses blocked lens imposed myopia by reducing axial growth in monocular treatments where less myopia was produced. Lower doses were not effective in reducing myopia at higher rates of development in binocularly treated animals.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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