June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Ranibizumab therapy for Myopic CNVM
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hetvi Bhatt
    Ophthalmology, NHS Forth Valley, Falkirk, United Kingdom
    Ophthalmology, Luton and Dunstable University Hospital, Luton, United Kingdom
  • Oluremi Adenuga
    Ophthalmology, Luton and Dunstable University Hospital, Luton, United Kingdom
  • Ranjit Sandhu
    Ophthalmology, Luton and Dunstable University Hospital, Luton, United Kingdom
  • Venki Sundaram
    Ophthalmology, Luton and Dunstable University Hospital, Luton, United Kingdom
  • Mala Subash
    Ophthalmology, Luton and Dunstable University Hospital, Luton, United Kingdom
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Hetvi Bhatt, None; Oluremi Adenuga, None; Ranjit Sandhu, None; Venki Sundaram, None; Mala Subash, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 5494. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Hetvi Bhatt, Oluremi Adenuga, Ranjit Sandhu, Venki Sundaram, Mala Subash; Ranibizumab therapy for Myopic CNVM. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):5494.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Choroidal neovascular membrane (CNVM) is a vision threatening complication of myopia. Previous treatment options included laser photocoagulation and verteporfin photodynamic therapy; however, recently anti-Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) therapy has superseded these methods. We performed a retrospective observational clinical study to compare visual outcomes following intravitreal ranibizumab (0.5mg) injections for myopic CNVM at a United Kingdom District General Hospital with outcomes from published data.

Methods : This analysis included all patients receiving ranibizumab injections for myopic CNVM in the previous 2 years. Using our electronic records, we gathered data on patient demographics, refraction and EDTRS visual acuity at baseline, 3 months, 6 months and at final follow up.

Results : There were 13 patients, aged between 26 and 85. Mean spherical equivalent of the treated eye was -8.86D, with a range from -30.25D to -0.5D (n=9). Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) at baseline was 52.3±24.1 letters, improving to final BCVA 66.8±13.9 (p=0.009). An increase of 14.5±16.7 letters was seen in our treatment group. Total number of injections for our patients was 6.5±4.4. Mean follow-up was 12 months (range 3-26). It was also noted that patients with a worse presenting BCVA responded equally well to those with a better presenting BCVA, refraction had no real affect on visual outcome and younger patients responded better to treatment. There were no treatment related adverse events.

Conclusions : In comparison with published data, our study shows comparable improved visual outcomes which appears to be sustained at long term follow-up when treating myopic CNVM with ranibizumab. Treatment of myopic CNVM with ranibizumab achieves a more rapid stabilisation with fewer injections and a higher chance of improving baseline visual acuity compared to treating age-related macular degeneration. Collective data will pave the way to establishing optimum dosing frequency and monitoring intervals.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×