June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Prognostic Factors in Ocular Trauma and Correlation with the Ocular Trauma Score (OTS)
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alejandro Zermeno
    General Ophthalmology, Instituto de Oftalmolog�a Conde de Valenciana, M�xico City, Mexico
  • Ricardo Moreno
    General Ophthalmology, Instituto de Oftalmolog�a Conde de Valenciana, M�xico City, Mexico
  • Rodrigo Matsui-Serrano
    General Ophthalmology, Instituto de Oftalmolog�a Conde de Valenciana, M�xico City, Mexico
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Alejandro Zermeno, None; Ricardo Moreno, None; Rodrigo Matsui-Serrano, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 5515. doi:
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      Alejandro Zermeno, Ricardo Moreno, Rodrigo Matsui-Serrano; Prognostic Factors in Ocular Trauma and Correlation with the Ocular Trauma Score (OTS). Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):5515.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose : To describe demographic data, etiology, visual prognosis and correlation with the OTS in patients with ocular trauma with no prior ocular disease in an ophthalmologic center in Mexico

Methods : A retrospective study that included patients with severe open or closed ocular trauma, meaning at least one trauma zone affected, attended in the emergency department from January 2015 to May 2016
Inclusion criteria were all patients who had at least 6 months follow up and no prior ocular disease.
Exclusion criteria were patients who didn’t have proper follow-up, who had other causes that could lower visual acuity, patients uncooperative to the visual acuity test or the ophthalmologic evaluation,

Results : We included 163 patients with ocular trauma, 133 men (81%) and 30 women (19%), Right eye was affected in 51% of the cases. 104 patients had closed trauma and 59 had an open globe at the moment of their first visit. The BETT was used to classify the type of trauma. The closed trauma patients were divided into blunt trauma (102 patients) and lamellar injuries (2 patients). Patients with open trauma where divided into rupture (9 patients), penetrating trauma (44 patients), perforating trauma (2 patients) and foreign intraocular body (4 patients). The trauma zones affected were 49% in Zone I, 36% in Zone II and 30% in Zone III. Eleven patients were in Group 1 of the OTS Raw Score Sum, all of them had visual acuities at 6 months of NLP or LP. Groups 2 and 3 had 25 and 27 patients, respectively, with visual acuities ranging from NLP to >20/40 in both groups. Groups 4 and 5 had mostly good prognosis with over 77% and 98% respectively, with visual acuity of 20/40 or better at the end of the follow-up. 3 patients developed endophtalmitis in this study, all of them in the open globe injury group.

Conclusions : Ocular trauma is a common diagnosis in the emergency departments of both general and ophthalmological hospitals. The initial evaluation is important to determine the prognosis and the OTS continues to be a useful tool in our population. Trauma in more than one zone was also a risk factor for low visual acuity at final visit. Open globe injury and endophtalmitis are both independent risk factors for bad prognosis.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

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