June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
Peripapillary Pigmentation and Optic Disc Morphology in Newborns with Treatment-Warranted Retinopathy of Prematurity
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Tiffany Ann Chen
    Ophthalmology, Byers Eye Institute, Stanford University, Anaheim, California, United States
  • Cassie Ludwig
    Ophthalmology, Byers Eye Institute, Stanford University, Anaheim, California, United States
  • Darius M Moshfeghi
    Ophthalmology, Byers Eye Institute, Stanford University, Anaheim, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Tiffany Chen, None; Cassie Ludwig, None; Darius Moshfeghi, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  This study was supported by the Stanford University School of Medicine Medical Scholars Research Program to Tiffany A. Chen.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 5537. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Tiffany Ann Chen, Cassie Ludwig, Darius M Moshfeghi; Peripapillary Pigmentation and Optic Disc Morphology in Newborns with Treatment-Warranted Retinopathy of Prematurity. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):5537.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : Little is known about the changes in peripapillary area and optic disc morphology during the progression of treatment-warranted retinopathy of prematurity (TW-ROP). We performed a retrospective, case-control study to better understand the differences in peripapillary pigmentation and optic disc area between the first and last screening exams for infants at risk for ROP.

Methods : All premature newborns screened for ROP as part of the Stanford University Network for Diagnosis of Retinopathy of Prematurity (SUNDROP) initiative between December 1, 2005 and December 30, 2015 were reviewed. Two control newborns without TW-ROP were matched by gestational age to each TW-ROP newborn identified. For the first and last ROP screening exams, mean gray value (MGV), peripapillary pigmentation area (PPA), integrated density (ID), optic disc area (ODA), and cup-to-disc area (CDA) were measured from fundus photos using ImageJ. Statistical analyses were performed using SAS software with p < 0.05 indicating statistical significance.

Results : Of 843 screened newborns, 37 had TW-ROP with an average gestational age of 25 weeks. As expected, TW-ROP babies had significantly lower birth-weights than non-TW-ROP babies (691.3 g vs. 770.2 g, p = 0.014). No significant differences in sex or multiplicity were observed. From first to last screening exams, the MGV in TW-ROP babies decreased by 4.68 units (p<0.0001) vs. 2.65 units in non-TW-ROP babies (p=0.0699), PPA increased by 0.1 mm2 (p=0.0707) vs. decreased by 0.17 mm2 (p=0.0047), and ID increased by 25.13 units*mm2 (p=0.1734) vs. decreased by 44.06 units*mm2 (p=0.0021). A 1:2 case:control matched analysis showed statistically significant differences in PPA and ID from first to last screening exams between TW-ROP and non-TW-ROP babies (PPA p= 0.0118 and ID p=0.0155). There was no difference in ODA or CDA from first to last screening exams between the two groups.

Conclusions : Our results showed no difference in the ODA, but a significant difference in PPA and ID from first to last ROP screening exams between TW-ROP and non-TW-ROP newborns. The decrease in MGV from first to last ROP exam was greater in TW-ROP babies, indicating that peripapillary pigmentation became darker to a greater degree in TW-ROP as compared to non-TW-ROP newborns. The clinical significance of these results remains to be determined.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×