June 2017
Volume 58, Issue 8
Open Access
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2017
In quest of a novel artificial cornea using biomimetic nanotopography
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kate Xie
    Ophthalmology, Gavin Herbert Eye Institute, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Elena Liang
    Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Mary Dickson
    Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Priscilla Vu
    Ophthalmology, Gavin Herbert Eye Institute, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Albert Yee
    Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Marjan Farid
    Ophthalmology, Gavin Herbert Eye Institute, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, California, United States
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships   Kate Xie, None; Elena Liang, None; Mary Dickson, None; Priscilla Vu, None; Albert Yee, None; Marjan Farid, None
  • Footnotes
    Support  None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2017, Vol.58, 5709. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to Subscribers Only
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Kate Xie, Elena Liang, Mary Dickson, Priscilla Vu, Albert Yee, Marjan Farid; In quest of a novel artificial cornea using biomimetic nanotopography. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2017;58(8):5709.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose : By incorporating nanotopography to the surface on a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) button, we present a novel artificial cornea design to address some of the challenges with current available devices. This study demonstrates the durability of design in porcine and human cadaver corneas.

Methods : A curved PMMA button was milled down and cut into shape using instruments similar to those used in manufacturing hard contact lenses. 8 suture holes were drilled in the skirt. A second version of this button was modified using a nanoimprinting technique to provide differential nanotexturing to the central area of the device.

The PMMA buttons were implanted into two porcine eyes and one human cadaver eye. The recipient cornea was cut using a 6 mm trephine. A crescent blade was used to create a plane within the stroma to place the skirt of the device. The implant was then sutured into place with eight 10-0 nylon sutures passed through the drilled suture holes.

Results : Our PMMA prototype was successfully implanted into porcine and human cadaver eyes using standard corneal transplantation instruments. There was no structural damage to the prototype, and it was able to be sutured into place. Raising the intraocular pressure demonstrated gross wound stability with water tight seal even at above normal physiologic tensions.

Conclusions : We describe a novel design of artificial cornea and its successful implantation into porcine and human cadaver eyes. This design uses differential surface nanotexturing to potentially alter cell adhesion, thereby minimizing bacterial adherence and improving integration into the human cornea. Future studies will address durability and integration of the device into live animal models.

This is an abstract that was submitted for the 2017 ARVO Annual Meeting, held in Baltimore, MD, May 7-11, 2017.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×