May 1971
Volume 10, Issue 5
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Articles  |   May 1971
Morphology of Experimental Vaccinial Superficial Punctate Keratitis--A Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopic Study
Author Affiliations
  • BRIAN R. MATAS
    Eye Pathology Laboratoiy, Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco
  • WILLIAM H. SPENCER
    Eye Pathology Laboratoiy, Department of Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco
  • THOMAS L. HAYES
    Donner Laboratory, Lawrence Radiation Laboratories, University of California, Berkele
  • CHANDLER R. DAWSON
    Francis I. Proctor Foundation for Research in Ophthalmology, University of California, San Francisco, Calif.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 1971, Vol.10, 348-356. doi:
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      BRIAN R. MATAS, WILLIAM H. SPENCER, THOMAS L. HAYES, CHANDLER R. DAWSON; Morphology of Experimental Vaccinial Superficial Punctate Keratitis--A Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopic Study. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1971;10(5):348-356.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Rabbit corneas infected with vaccinia virus xoere studied by scanning electron microscopy. The earliest detectable lesion consisted of tiny punctate epithelial pits lined by the intact superficial layers of the epithelium. These lesions were presumed produced by the dissolution of the wing cells with inward collapse of the overlying superficial layer. Examination of more advanced and severe lesions suggested that the further progression consisted of erosion through the superficial layer followed by erosion internally through the basal layerto expose the stroma. With coalescence of adjacent lesions, the punctate appearance of these lesions was lost.

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