September 1972
Volume 11, Issue 9
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Articles  |   September 1972
An Analysis of Retinal Receptor Orientation
Author Affiliations
  • JAY M. ENOCH
    Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, The Oscar Johnson Institute, St. Louis, Mo. 63110.
  • G. M. HOPE
    Washington University School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology, The Oscar Johnson Institute, St. Louis, Mo. 63110.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 1972, Vol.11, 765-782. doi:
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      JAY M. ENOCH, G. M. HOPE; An Analysis of Retinal Receptor Orientation . Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1972;11(9):765-782.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Retinal receptors are directionally sensitive for light entering different parts of the eye pupil. The central tendency of photoreceptor orientation at any retinal point can be inferred by carefully determining the position of the peak of the photopic Stiles-Crawford (S-C) function relative to the center of the entrance pupil of the eye. Transretinal orientation can be deduced by making such determinations at a number of points across the retina, and considering the collective distribution of the resultant peaks of the S-C functions in the entrance pupil. A new Stiles-Crawford apparatus was employed, and data were analyzed in terms of experimental models previously defined by Enoch and Laties.1 Laties' earlier histologic finding of anterior pointing and graded differential orientation of retinal receptors has been confirmed psychophysically in vivo, and has been extended to the human. The anterior point toward which the receptors are carefully aligned was found to be most probably the center of the exit pupil of the eye. This finding has important implications in terms of the efficiency of utilization of the relevant visual stimulus by the receptor and provides us with considerable insight relative to the role of retinal receptor optics in vision.

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