March 1973
Volume 12, Issue 3
Free
Articles  |   March 1973
Vascular Perfusion Pressure Gradients in the Eye
Author Affiliations
  • SAMUEL MASKET
    Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Center for Chronic Disease, Bird S. Coler Hospital, Welfare Island, New York, N.Y.
  • MILTON BEST
    Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Center for Chronic Disease, Bird S. Coler Hospital, Welfare Island, New York, N.Y.
  • ASHER ZEEV RABINOVITZ
    Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Center for Chronic Disease, Bird S. Coler Hospital, Welfare Island, New York, N.Y.
  • GEORGE PLECHATY
    Department of Ophthalmology, New York Medical College, Center for Chronic Disease, Bird S. Coler Hospital, Welfare Island, New York, N.Y.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 1973, Vol.12, 198-203. doi:https://doi.org/
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      SAMUEL MASKET, MILTON BEST, ASHER ZEEV RABINOVITZ, GEORGE PLECHATY; Vascular Perfusion Pressure Gradients in the Eye. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1973;12(3):198-203. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The intraocular pressures required to terminate blood flow in the retina, choroid, and anterior uvea were compared. The retinal and choroidal circulations were studied by ophthalmodynamometry while the choroidal and anterior uveal circulations were compared by direct cannulation experiments. The results indicated that as intraocular pressure is gradually elevated toward ophthalmic artery pressure, blood flow ceases in a sequential pattern in the anterior uveal, choroidal, and retinal circulations. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were 14 and 13 mm. Hg lower, respectively, in the choroid than in the retina. Circulation ceased in the anterior uvea at levels of intraocidar pressure 5 to 20 mm. Hg lower than that required to terminate blood flow in the choroid. The relationship of these results to vascular perfusion pressure in various segments of the eye is discussed.

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