June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Vitreoretinal interface abnormalities and viscoelastic behavior of the vitreous
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sanket Shah
    Department of Ophthalmology - Retina Division, Jules Stein Eye Institute and David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
  • David Reed
    Department of Ophthalmology - Retina Division, Jules Stein Eye Institute and David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
  • Sam Abbassi
    Department of Ophthalmology - Retina Division, Jules Stein Eye Institute and David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
  • Ryan Freeman
    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
  • Pooria Sharif-Kashani
    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
  • Pirouz Kavehpour
    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
  • Jean-Pierre Hubschman
    Department of Ophthalmology - Retina Division, Jules Stein Eye Institute and David Geffen School of Medicine, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Sanket Shah, None; David Reed, None; Sam Abbassi, None; Ryan Freeman, None; Pooria Sharif-Kashani, None; Pirouz Kavehpour, None; Jean-Pierre Hubschman, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 1590. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Sanket Shah, David Reed, Sam Abbassi, Ryan Freeman, Pooria Sharif-Kashani, Pirouz Kavehpour, Jean-Pierre Hubschman; Vitreoretinal interface abnormalities and viscoelastic behavior of the vitreous. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):1590. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: The study hypothesis is that the human vitreous has viscoelastic properties that are related to tangential and anteroposterior tractional forces acting at the vitreoretinal interface causing vitreoretinal abnormalities. We evaluated the differences in the viscoelastic properties of human vitreous samples following vitrectomy in different vitreoretinal interface abnormalities.

Methods: Undiluted chopped vitreous samples were collected during vitrectomy using predetermined machine settings from patient eyes with different vitreoretinal interface abnormalities. The viscosity and creep compliance of these samples were measured using a parallel plate shear rheometer. Statistical analysis was performed to investigate association of different vitreoretinal diseases with the viscoelastic properties.

Results: Of 81 patient eyes undergoing vitrectomy, the chopped vitreous was suitable for rheological tests to obtain creep compliance in 65 (80%) and viscosity in 30 (37%) patients. The vitreoretinal interface abnormalities in 65 patients were grouped into four groups based on the type of vitreoretinal interface forces. These included tangential vitreo-retinal (VR) traction (group A), anteroposterior VR traction (group B), combined tangential and anteroposterior VR traction (group C), and no VR traction (group D). The creep compliances (mean ± SD) in these groups were 111.18 ± 47.99/Pa, 104.50 ± 68.87/Pa, 49.38 ± 55.68/Pa, and 117.08 ± 61.67/Pa respectively. The creep compliance of group C was significantly lower than groups A (p=0.007), B (p=0.011), and D (p=0.012). Viscosity data were available for 30 patients and did not show significant differences.

Conclusions: The vitreous from eyes with vitreoretinal interface forces in both anteroposterior and tangential directions has lower compliance (higher elasticity) than all other groups. The macromolecular structural components of the vitreous that contribute to this low compliance may play a role in producing the prevalent vitreoretinal interface forces.

Keywords: 763 vitreous • 692 retinal adhesion • 636 pathobiology  
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