June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Pulse-induced Optic Nerve Head Axial Movement: Characterization by Phase-sensitive OCT in Humans
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ruikang Wang
    Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
    Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
  • lin an
    Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
  • Peng Li
    Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
  • Murray Johnstone
    Ophthalmology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 1712. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Ruikang Wang, lin an, Peng Li, Murray Johnstone; Pulse-induced Optic Nerve Head Axial Movement: Characterization by Phase-sensitive OCT in Humans. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):1712.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To evaluate pulse-induced motion of the human optic nerve head (ONH) using high-speed phase-sensitive spectral domain OCT

 
Methods
 

A phase-sensitive OCT system was developed to image the ONH with an imaging speed of 500 kHz A-scan rate. Phase information was extracted from the OCT signals and employed as a sensitive quantitative tool for assessing pulse-induced axial ONH movement. Pulsatile blood flow from the central retinal artery (CRA) was simultaneously imaged permitting correlation with ONH movement. Normal subjects (N=5) participated in the study.

 
Results
 

Each subject exhibited pulse-induced ONH axial movement with a mean magnitude of 3.5±0.8 µm and a fundamental frequency of 1.2±0.2 Hz. ONH movement was 100% negatively correlated with the CRA pulse peak. Figure shows typical results from one subject: (a) typical structural OCT image encompassing the ONH (temporal-nasal section) and adjacent retina. (b) Corresponding phase-sensitive image. (c) Dynamic ONH velocity map over ~5 sec: the ONH movement exhibits an obvious pulsatile pattern (right side of image). (d) Corresponding displacement map of the ONH, obtained by integrating (c) over the time t. (e) The velocity curve of pulse-induced ONH movement extracted from the position marked by the black line in (c) and the yellow line in (a). Note the y-axis required reversal. (f) Frequency analysis of (e), indicating a fundamental frequency of 1.2 Hz (in this case), and the higher order harmonics (e.g. 2nd and 3rd harmonics) also present. (g) and (h) Corresponding ONH displacement curve (max magnitude = 3.6 µm) and frequency analysis. (l) and (m) OCT structural image (superior-inferior section) and the corresponding blood flow map, indicating retinal artery measured (circled). (n) and (o) Measured pulsatile blood flow pattern from the CRA (5 sec duration) and the corresponding frequency analysis, indicating 100% correlation with ONH movement.

 
Conclusions
 

The high-speed, phase-sensitive OCT system successfully documented pulse-induced axial ONH movement that was 100% negatively correlated with the CRA pulse peak. Characterization of ONH movement permits assessment of mechanical compliance, an important property that may have mechanistic, diagnostic and prognostic significance in management of glaucoma.

  
Keywords: 629 optic nerve • 577 lamina cribrosa • 552 imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound)  
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