June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Subconjunctival and intrastromal Bevacizumab to control of corneal neovascularization and opacification
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Silvia Mendez
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Santiago de Compostela (USC) Hospital Complex, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
  • Maria Santiago
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Santiago de Compostela (USC) Hospital Complex, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
  • Elena Raposo
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Santiago de Compostela (USC) Hospital Complex, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
  • Rosario Touriño
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Santiago de Compostela (USC) Hospital Complex, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
  • Maria Teresa Rodriguez-Ares
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Santiago de Compostela (USC) Hospital Complex, Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 2104. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      Silvia Mendez, Maria Santiago, Elena Raposo, Rosario Touriño, Maria Teresa Rodriguez-Ares; Subconjunctival and intrastromal Bevacizumab to control of corneal neovascularization and opacification. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):2104.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: Bevacizumab is a recombinant humanized monoclonal antibody directed against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of subconjunctival and intrastromal injection of Bevacizumab on corneal neovascularization (CNV) and the secondary opacification.

Methods: We have performed a prospective nonrandomized interventional study, including 15 eyes with CNV secondary to: keratoplasty due to corneal ectasia (n = 2), keratoplasty due to herpetic keratitis (n = 3), keratoplasty due to bullous keratopathy (n = 2), herpetic keratopathy previously treated with amniotic membrane transplantation (n = 2), chemical burns (n = 3) and CNV after pterygium surgery (n = 3). We have injected 2.5 mg / 0.1 ml of Bevacizumab, subconjunctival and intrastromal, in the area with CNV. We have analyzed the CNV regression by anterior segment phothography in relation to the total corneal area. Furthermore, we have evaluated the decrease of corneal opacity regarding lipid deposits, corneal edema and local inflammation.

Results: We have observed regression of CNV in all patients. The mean area of CNV regression was 37% with a range between 6 and 86%. We have noticed improvement especially in younger vessels and smaller caliber vessels (p<0.001). In 6 cases there was a decrease of corneal opacification (p=0.46). There were no significant adverse effects.

Conclusions: Intrastromal and subconjunctival injections of Bevacizumab are effective for the reduction of CNV and seem to be useful in terms of decreasing lipid deposits, corneal edema and local inflammation.

Keywords: 479 cornea: clinical science • 748 vascular endothelial growth factor • 609 neovascularization  
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