June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Imaging of Surface Defects and Biofilm Formation of Extruded Keratoprostheses Using Confocal Microscopy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Heather Durkee
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Engineering, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL
  • Darlene Miller
    Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Victor Perez
    Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Yoh Sawatari
    Department of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Aleksandra Rachitskaya
    Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Audina Berrocal
    Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Eduardo Alfonso
    Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Jean-Marie Parel
    Ophthalmic Biophysics Center, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
    Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Heather Durkee, None; Darlene Miller, None; Victor Perez, Alcon (C), Bausch & Lomb (C), Genentech (C), Cleveland Clinic Foundation (P), Alcon (F), Alcon (R); Yoh Sawatari, University of MIami (P); Aleksandra Rachitskaya, None; Audina Berrocal, thrombogenics (C), genentech (C); Eduardo Alfonso, Bio Tissue (C); Jean-Marie Parel, CROMA (F), InnFocus (F), Abeamed (F), University of Miami (P)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 3470. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Heather Durkee, Darlene Miller, Victor Perez, Yoh Sawatari, Aleksandra Rachitskaya, Audina Berrocal, Eduardo Alfonso, Jean-Marie Parel; Imaging of Surface Defects and Biofilm Formation of Extruded Keratoprostheses Using Confocal Microscopy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):3470. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose
 

The goal of the study was to examine surface structure and biofilm deposits on keratoprostheses (KPro) that extruded from patients secondary to Streptococcal Endophthalmitis. Confocal microscopy studies allow for fresh cultures in contrast to biofilm detection using SEM which was presented previously (De La Cruz et al, IOVS Meeting abstracts 2011 52:345).

 
Methods
 

Three keratoprostheses (2 Boston Type I and 1 Modified Osteo Odonto Keratoprothesis (MOOKP)) that extruded due to Streptococcal Endophthalmitis were stained with BacLight Live/Dead fluorescence assay and imaged with a Leica 5PS confocal microscope with 63x objective lens. Surface features of the keratoprostheses were visualized using bright field illumination. The biofilm and bacteria distribution across the entire KPro were evaluated using volumetric image sets that were captured from different regions of the keratoprostheses.

 
Results
 

Biofilm deposits were present on all three of the KPros (see Figure). Bacteria were found in higher quantities in areas of the optic with surface scratches. Surface features corresponding to machining marks were found on the 2 Boston KPros and surface scratches on both of the optical surfaces of all KPros.

 
Conclusions
 

Surface irregularities on the KPros created during fabrication allowed for more bacterial and biofilm growth. Improving surface quality of the implants might reduce the areas where bacteria and biofilm can attach to the keratoprothesis.

 
 
Figure 1: Image A (left) bright field of scratches on cylindrical face of MOOKP (right) live dead stain of same section, biofilm deposits appear in dome-like shapes; Image B (left) bright field of deep scratch in cylindrical face of MOOKP, (right) bacteria deposit in crevices of scratch; Image C (left) bright field of center anterior face of KPro#1, machining marks can been identified as concentric rings (right) organic matter deposited on anterior face of optic; Image D unidentified mark on posterior face of optic (inside anterior chamber)
 
Figure 1: Image A (left) bright field of scratches on cylindrical face of MOOKP (right) live dead stain of same section, biofilm deposits appear in dome-like shapes; Image B (left) bright field of deep scratch in cylindrical face of MOOKP, (right) bacteria deposit in crevices of scratch; Image C (left) bright field of center anterior face of KPro#1, machining marks can been identified as concentric rings (right) organic matter deposited on anterior face of optic; Image D unidentified mark on posterior face of optic (inside anterior chamber)
 
Keywords: 575 keratoprostheses  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×