June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Utility of Infrared Imaging For Visualizing Persistent Subretinal Fluid After Retinal Detachment Surgery
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Do Gyun Kim
    Ophthalmology, Eye institute, Medical College of Wisconsin,, Milwaukee, WI
    Ophthalmology, Myongji Hospital, Medical College , Kwandong university, Go-yang, Republic of Korea
  • Dennis Han
    Ophthalmology, Eye institute, Medical College of Wisconsin,, Milwaukee, WI
  • David Weinberg
    Ophthalmology, Eye institute, Medical College of Wisconsin,, Milwaukee, WI
  • Judy Kim
    Ophthalmology, Eye institute, Medical College of Wisconsin,, Milwaukee, WI
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Do Gyun Kim, None; Dennis Han, None; David Weinberg, Regeneron (F); Judy Kim, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 3591. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      Do Gyun Kim, Dennis Han, David Weinberg, Judy Kim; Utility of Infrared Imaging For Visualizing Persistent Subretinal Fluid After Retinal Detachment Surgery. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):3591. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: Persistent subretinal fluid (PSRF) located at the macula after rhegmatogenous retinal detachment (RRD) surgery may be responsible for delayed visual recovery and may affect the final visual outcome. However, PSRF may be difficult to detect on clinical examination. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is useful to diagnose PSRF. In this study, the utility of infrared (IR) imaging for visualizing PSRF was explored and compared to other imaging modalities.

Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed on 4 eyes of 4 patients with PSRF following scleral buckling procedure (SBP) or pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) for RRD repair. The IR images and spectral domain OCT images obtained were analyzed and qualitatively compared. Fluorescein angiography (FA), indocyanine green angiography (ICGA), autofluorescence (AF), and color fundus photography were also compared with IR images when available.

Results: Two patients had been treated with SBP and two patients with PPV. Initial imaging was performed a mean of 2.7 months (range: 1-5 months) following surgery. While OCT imaging was useful in making the diagnosis of PSRF as well as documenting the height and the width of pockets of PSRF, IR imaging allowed en face imaging of the multiple loculated pockets of SRF seen as dark oval or lobulated lesions of various sizes. In all patients, IR imaging was able to document small pockets of PSRF even when OCT appeared normal in the region or when pockets of PSRF were outside of the OCT scan region. IR imaging was able to show changing size and the distribution of PSRF over time. In one patient, while OCT imaging indicated resolution of PSRF by 5 months after surgery, IR imaging did not appear normal until 12 months after surgery. Even when pockets of PSRF were not visible on FA, ICG, AF, or color photos, IR imaging allowed visualization.

Conclusions: While OCT is helpful in making the diagnosis of PSRF, IR imaging was helpful in demonstrating the extent and distribution of PSRF pockets and was able to track changes over time. IR imaging demonstrated presence of PSRF, even when not visible with other imaging modalities. This imaging modality should be helpful in documenting and following changes in PSRF

Keywords: 550 imaging/image analysis: clinical • 552 imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) • 697 retinal detachment  
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