June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Eye Movement Perimetry in Glaucoma Patients
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Alice Xu
    Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA
  • David Warren
    Department of Neurology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Carrie Doyle
    Iowa City VA Health Care System, Iowa City, IA
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Andrew Papendieck
    Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA
  • Matthew Thurtell
    Iowa City VA Health Care System, Iowa City, IA
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
  • Michael Wall
    Iowa City VA Health Care System, Iowa City, IA
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 3953. doi:
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      Alice Xu, David Warren, Carrie Doyle, Andrew Papendieck, Matthew Thurtell, Michael Wall; Eye Movement Perimetry in Glaucoma Patients. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):3953.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

We have developed a new perimetry test that evaluates two novel eye movement measures in addition to visual threshold. We hypothesized that optic nerve damage seen in glaucoma patients will result in increased visual threshold, reduced saccadic accuracy, and lengthened saccadic latency when compared with normals.

 
Methods
 

19 glaucoma patients (56 to 78 years) had visual thresholds tested at 3 test locations based on Standard Automated Perimetry (SAP)-determined visual loss: normal sensitivity (+2 to -2dB on total deviation plot), mild visual loss (-3 to -6dB), and moderate loss (-7 to -16dB). 29 age-matched ocular healthy subjects (49 to 74 years) were tested at 3 test locations based on eccentricity: central (3, -3), middle (3, 9), and peripheral (-21, 3). Frequency of seeing curves were constructed using a circular light gray stimulus presented on a dark gray background. Size was varied and location presentation randomized. An EyeLink1000 infrared camera recorded saccadic eye movements to the stimulus. Using threshold and suprathreshold data from frequency of seeing curves, we compared visual threshold (50% seen stimulus), saccadic accuracy (measured as localization error—the distance between recorded final eye position and stimulus position), and saccadic latency (time taken to initiate a saccade to the stimulus) between glaucoma patients and normals matched in eccentricity. Differences among groups were assessed using ANOVA.

 
Results
 

Glaucoma patients had higher visual thresholds (Threshold, graph A, p < .001) and decreased saccadic accuracy (Localization Error, graph B, p = .008) as compared with normals. Eye movement perimetry also showed reduced saccadic accuracy for test locations that SAP considered as normal sensitivity. Threshold increased and localization error increased in this order: normals, glaucoma normal sensitivity, glaucoma mild damage, and glaucoma moderate damage. Saccadic latency measures showed no significant differences between normals and glaucoma patients (Latency, graph C, p = .12).

 
Conclusions
 

Eye movement perimetry shows a significant increase in saccadic localization error with increasing glaucomatous damage; saccadic latencies, however, did not significantly change.

 
 
Diamond designates mean value for normals and glaucoma test locations of normal or mild or moderate damage. Bars designate 1SD. Stars designate statistical significance.
 
Diamond designates mean value for normals and glaucoma test locations of normal or mild or moderate damage. Bars designate 1SD. Stars designate statistical significance.
 
Keywords: 525 eye movements: saccades and pursuits • 758 visual fields • 642 perimetry  
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