June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Prevalence of Asteroid Hyalosis in Human and Canine Melanoma Eyes
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Heather Potter
    Ophthalmology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
  • Mozhgan Rezaei Kanavi
    Ophthalmology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
    Ophthalmic Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran
  • Amir Azari
    Ophthalmology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
  • Richard Dubielzig
    Ophthalmology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
  • Daniel Albert
    Ophthalmology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 4247. doi:
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      Heather Potter, Mozhgan Rezaei Kanavi, Amir Azari, Richard Dubielzig, Daniel Albert; Prevalence of Asteroid Hyalosis in Human and Canine Melanoma Eyes. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):4247.

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

To explore a possible association between presence of asteroid hyalosis (AH) and uveal melanoma in human and animal subjects.

 
Methods
 

The histopathologic slides of enucleated melanoma eyes in the collection of the eye pathology laboratory of University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health were reviewed for the presence of AH. The histopathologic data of the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin (COPLOW) were also reviewed for incidence of AH in canine eyes with the diagnosis of uveal melanoma. For human control group, the incidence of AH in patients seen at the University of Wisconsin Eye clinic was established based on the records provided to us by the retina service. The control group for the dog eyes consisted of those enucleated for a common non-neoplastic eye disease (goniodysgenesis). Then the association of AH with uveal melanoma in human and dogs was evaluated.

 
Results
 

AH was found in 12 out of 1759 human eyes (0.7%) with uveal melanoma (Figure 1). Forty three out of 5218 patients (0.82%) seen at the eye clinic were shown to have AH. The prevalence of asteroid hyalosis in human melanoma eyes was comparable with those of age-matched patients seen at the eye clinic (control group). The rate of AH in dogs with the diagnosis of uveal melanoma was 6.2% (46 out of 746 eyes) while it was 1.9% (45 out of 2309 eyes) in the control group (eyes with goniodysgenesis).

 
Conclusions
 

Although we observed a three-fold increase in the rate of AH in melanoma eyes in dogs compared to the control, no similar association was found between AH and uveal melanoma in humans.

 
 
Figure 1. Image depicts the round spherules of asteroid hyalosis in vitreous of a human eye with uveal melanoma (Alcian blue X400).
 
Figure 1. Image depicts the round spherules of asteroid hyalosis in vitreous of a human eye with uveal melanoma (Alcian blue X400).
 
Keywords: 589 melanoma  
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