June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Plasma VEGF-levels are variable in patients with persistent renal dysfunction and diabetes: possible implications and risks for ophthalmic anti-VEGF therapy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Markus van der Giet
    Med. Klinik - SP Nephrology, Charite - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Mirjam Schuchardt
    Med. Klinik - SP Nephrology, Charite - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Nicole Pruefer
    Med. Klinik - SP Nephrology, Charite - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Jasmin Pruefer
    Med. Klinik - SP Nephrology, Charite - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Markus van der Giet, Novartis (F), Roche (F), Novartis (C), Takeda (F), Bayer (C); Mirjam Schuchardt, Deutsche Hochdruckliga (F), Peter und Traudl Engelhorn Stiftung (F), Sonnenfeld Stiftung (F); Nicole Pruefer, None; Jasmin Pruefer, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 4653. doi:https://doi.org/
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Markus van der Giet, Mirjam Schuchardt, Nicole Pruefer, Jasmin Pruefer; Plasma VEGF-levels are variable in patients with persistent renal dysfunction and diabetes: possible implications and risks for ophthalmic anti-VEGF therapy. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):4653. doi: https://doi.org/.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Purpose: Ophthalmic anti-VEGF therapies are used commonly without monitoring of systemic risks and their intraocular application might cause unexpected effects to systemic VEGF-dependent regulatory mechanisms. Our study aims at quantifying systemic VEGF-levels in situations commonly found in the target population of ocular anti-VEGFs

Methods: Blood was drawn form 30 healthy controls (age 28-78 years), 30 patients with type I or II diabetes without renal dysfunction (24-84 years, DM), 30 patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) stage III-V (incl. hemodialysis patients) and 30 patients with type I/II diabetes and renal dysfunction (CKD III-V, CKD/DM). VEGF A-D were quantified using 96-well ELISA (Cusabio, Wuhan, China) according to manufacturer’s protocol. VEGF levels were quantified by comparison to standard concentration curves; all values are given as means.

Results: Mean plasma VEGF A levels were 85.8 pg/ml in healthy controls and 77.6 pg/ml in DM patients. These levels were moderately elevated in CKD (129.92pg/ml) and CKD/DM (111.9 pg/ml) patients (p<0.05). Levels of VEGF-B were significantly elevated in DM (169.3 pg/ml), CKD (271.4 p/ml) and CKD/DM patients (697.1 pg/ml) in comparison to controls (105.6 pg/ml). Changes of VEGF C levels were massive and significant in CKD (1187.4 pg/ml), DM (214.7 pg/ml), and CKD/DM (3939.1pg/ml) patients compared to controls (162.2pg/ml). VEGF D levels were very similar to VEGF A, with no significant differences between controls (89,3 pg/ml) and DM patients (61.0 pg/ml) while there was a significant increase in CKD (209,4 pg/ml) and CKD/DM (208.2pg/ml).

Conclusions: Our data show that the plasma VEGF levels in elderly patients (target population for ophthalmic anti-VEGF treatment) are affected by disease status as seen in Diabetes Mellitus and even more in Chronic Kidney Disease, especially for the VEGF B and C isoforms. The physiopathology and relevance of these changes remain unclear but caution should be taken in risk patients when injecting ophthalmic anti-VEGFs with a long plasma half-life, implying a high systemic exposure.

Keywords: 748 vascular endothelial growth factor  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×