June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Comparison of ocular parameters of Bugeye and Wild-type zebrafish using Optical Coherence Tomography
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Pinakin Davey
    College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA
  • D Joshua Cameron
    College of Optometry, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Pinakin Davey, None; D Joshua Cameron, None
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 4874. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Pinakin Davey, D Joshua Cameron; Comparison of ocular parameters of Bugeye and Wild-type zebrafish using Optical Coherence Tomography. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):4874. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract
 
Purpose
 

The bugeye zebrafish with a recessive mutation in the lrp2 gene has some similarities with human glaucoma due to its elevated intraocular pressure and optic nerve pathology. The purpose of this study was evaluate and compare the ocular parameters of bugeye and wild-type zebrafish using Fourier Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT).

 
Methods
 

Adult zebrafish (22 eyes of 22 fish, age 19.3 months SD 0.5) Wild-type (TU/TL; n=10) and bugeye (n=12) were anesthetized in tricaine and placed on a styrofoam bed. Tricaine solution was perfused over the gills to keep the fish oxygenated and sedated. The Ivue OCT (Optovue) with an adapter to image anterior chamber was brought towards the fish eye. Eight line scans centered on the pupil (see figure) were captured automatically and machine software was utilized to analyze the scans (see figure). Ocular parameters measured were the central corneal thickness, anterior chamber angles, pupil diameter, distance between iris plane & posterior cornea, lens diameter in three axes, vitreous chamber depth and axial length. Analysis of variance was performed to evaluate if the ocular parameters measured were statistically significant between the two strains.

 
Results
 

The mean distance between iris plane to corneal endothelium was shorter and the mean pupil was smaller in the eyes of bugeye when compared to wild-type (p=0.02 and p=0.005). The axial length and vitreous chamber depth was longer in the bugeye when compared to the wild-type (p=0.0002 and p=0.0001). The anterior chamber angles, lens dimensions and central corneal thickness were not significantly different between the zebrafish strains.

 
Conclusions
 

Additional to the known elevated intraocular pressure in the bugeye there may be anterior chamber differences compared to the wild-type that explains glaucoma pathogenesis in part. The OCT provides the ability to measure such differences without sacrificing the animal.

 
 
Horizontal OCT line scans of an eye from wild type and bugeye zebrafish. A: Wild type zebrafish scan shows the anterior segment and posterior limit includes the retina. B: Scan of a bugeye, differences in terms of size were noted, with the lens occupying lesser area compared to the wild type. The posterior limits of the scan does not include retina. Axial length of the bugeye is elongated and it is outside the scan's capacity to image.
 
Horizontal OCT line scans of an eye from wild type and bugeye zebrafish. A: Wild type zebrafish scan shows the anterior segment and posterior limit includes the retina. B: Scan of a bugeye, differences in terms of size were noted, with the lens occupying lesser area compared to the wild type. The posterior limits of the scan does not include retina. Axial length of the bugeye is elongated and it is outside the scan's capacity to image.
 
Keywords: 552 imaging methods (CT, FA, ICG, MRI, OCT, RTA, SLO, ultrasound) • 421 anterior segment • 419 anatomy  
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