June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Short duration intraocular pressure patterns detected by a contact lens sensor for 24-hour recording
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kaweh Mansouri
    Glaucoma sector, Division of Ophthalmology, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland
    Department of Ophthalmology, Hamilton Glaucoma Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA
  • Robert Weinreb
    Department of Ophthalmology, Hamilton Glaucoma Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA
  • Rene Goedkoop
    Sensimed AG, Lausanne, Switzerland
  • Mona Moshtaghi
    Department of Ophthalmology, Hamilton Glaucoma Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA
  • Syril Dorairaj
    Department of Ophthalmology, Hamilton Glaucoma Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA
    Department of Ophthalmology, Mayo clinic, Jacksonville, FL
  • Ali Tafreshi
    Department of Ophthalmology, Hamilton Glaucoma Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA
  • John Liu
    Department of Ophthalmology, Hamilton Glaucoma Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA
  • Footnotes
    Commercial Relationships Kaweh Mansouri, Sensimed AG, Switzerland (C); Robert Weinreb, Aerie (F), Alcon (C), Allergan (C), Altheos (C), Amakem (C), Bausch&Lomb (C), Carl Zeiss-Meditec (C), Genentech (F), Haag-Streit (F), Heidelberg Engineering (F), Konan (F), Lumenis (F), National Eye Institute (F), Nidek (F), Optovue (C), Quark (C), Solx (C), Topcon (C); Rene Goedkoop, Sensimed AG (E); Mona Moshtaghi, None; Syril Dorairaj, None; Ali Tafreshi, None; John Liu, Allergan (F), Alcon (F), Aerie (F), Sensimed (F), Bausch + Lomb (F)
  • Footnotes
    Support None
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 5635. doi:https://doi.org/
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      Kaweh Mansouri, Robert Weinreb, Rene Goedkoop, Mona Moshtaghi, Syril Dorairaj, Ali Tafreshi, John Liu; Short duration intraocular pressure patterns detected by a contact lens sensor for 24-hour recording. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):5635. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Purpose: To demonstrate the ability of a contact lens sensor (CLS) to record short duration intraocular pressure (IOP) patterns.

Methods: A single-center, prospective, open label study was designed to record 24-hour IOP patterns using a CLS in healthy subjects and patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). Following ophthalmic examination, eligible subjects stayed at the sleep laboratory during the 24-hour IOP recording. The CLS (Triggerfish®, Sensimed AG, Switzerland) measures the circumferential changes of the cornea at the corneoscleral junction. Short duration efficacy of the CLS was defined as recording the known phenomenon of IOP increase when going from a wake (sitting) to a sleep state in the recumbent position (W/S slope, interval 1 hr before and after sleep) and to assess the ocular pulse frequency (OPF) relative to the measured heart rate. The OPF was read from CLS output by two blinded observers. The accuracy of the CLS to detect OPF had to be ≥70% for the CLS output interval (30 seconds every 5 minutes) concurrent to that of the heart rate interval (pulse over 6 consecutive minutes, 3 times during sleep). Accuracy of detecting the OPF was reached if the lower margin of the 95.25% confidence interval (CI) was ≥75%.

Results: Twenty-nine eligible participants (27 healthy subjects and 2 glaucoma patients), were included in the analysis. The mean age was 33.7±13.8 years, and 48% were female. The mean W/S slope was significantly positive (56.9±40.5; p<0.0001). Only one participant (3.4%) had a negative W/S slope. The two observers were in agreement for 84% of OPF plots from the CLS output (evaluable 44% and non-evaluable 40%, respectively). There was no agreement between observers for 16% of plots. Plots were not evaluable because patients were woken up for other measurements. The proportion of accurate OPF plots was 86.5% (45 out 52; 95.25% CI of 75%-93.2%). Given the predefined lower margin being within the CI, the CLS was accurate in detecting a short duration IOP pattern, the OPF.

Conclusions: The CLS is capable of recording short duration IOP patterns, the W/S slope and the OPF, indicating that the CLS output represents the effect of the IOP changes on the corneoscleral junction.

Keywords: 568 intraocular pressure  
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