June 2013
Volume 54, Issue 15
Free
ARVO Annual Meeting Abstract  |   June 2013
Myopia Progression Accompanying with Myopic Disc Change at the Convalescent Stage of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hiroyuki Takahashi
    Ophthal & Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ, Bukyo-ku, Japan
  • Hiroshi Takase
    Ophthal & Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ, Bukyo-ku, Japan
  • Noriaki Shimada
    Ophthal & Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ, Bukyo-ku, Japan
  • Kyoko Ohno-Matsui
    Ophthal & Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ, Bukyo-ku, Japan
  • Manabu Mochizuki
    Ophthal & Visual Science, Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ, Bukyo-ku, Japan
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 2013, Vol.54, 5868. doi:
  • Views
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      Hiroyuki Takahashi, Hiroshi Takase, Noriaki Shimada, Kyoko Ohno-Matsui, Manabu Mochizuki; Myopia Progression Accompanying with Myopic Disc Change at the Convalescent Stage of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 2013;54(15):5868.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract
 
Purpose
 

It has been reported that Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease at the convalescent stage shows a marked choroidal thinning, as seen in eyes with pathologic myopia. However, it is not clear if VKH disease causes development or progression of myopia. We examined myopia progression and myopic disc changes in patients with VKH disease at its convalescent stage.

 
Methods
 

Medical records of 25 VKH patients (49 eyes) whose disease duration was more than 1 year were reviewed. The ocular manifestations at the onset of the disease, and the long-term changes of refractive error and deformation of the optic disc, i.e. tilted disc and the development of conus, were investigated. Ovality of the optic disc was expressed as the ratio of vertical / horizontal disc diameter, and the myopic disc tilting was defined as the ovality change rate > 1.2. The changes of axial length (AL) were also investigated in 14 eyes of 7 patients, including 4 phakic eyes and 10 pseudophakic eyes at the initial examination.

 
Results
 

The mean follow up period was 5.0 (range; 1.1 to 11.9) years. None of them had cataract or refractive surgery during a follow-up. The mean myopic refractive error at the final examination was significantly greater than that at the initial examination(-2.58 diopter (D) Vs -1.66 D, P=0.0004; paired t test). The refractive error remained stable (<2.0 D difference) in 42 eyes, whereas the refractive error changed by >2.0 D in 7 eyes. Among the 14 eyes whose changes in AL were examined, the AL remained stable (<0.1 mm/year difference) in 9 eyes, whereas AL increased by >0.1mm/year in 5 eyes. Tilting disc and/or conus formation occurred in 12 eyes (Figure). The incidence of papillitis, serous retinal detachment, and hypotony at onset were not different significantly between myopic progressive eyes and stable eyes.

 
Conclusions
 

VKH patients showed progression of myopia and myopic disc changes in the convalescent stage of the disease. Although further studies are necessary, the choroidal thinning secondary to VKH might be related to myopic progression.

 
 
Fundus photography of 42-year-old woman showing myopic disc change. Eleven years later after onset, ovality of the disc (the ratio; vertical : horizontal diameter of the disc) changed from 1.04 to 1.73 in the right eye and from 1.06 to 1.55 in the left eye.
 
Fundus photography of 42-year-old woman showing myopic disc change. Eleven years later after onset, ovality of the disc (the ratio; vertical : horizontal diameter of the disc) changed from 1.04 to 1.73 in the right eye and from 1.06 to 1.55 in the left eye.
 
Keywords: 605 myopia • 550 imaging/image analysis: clinical • 451 chorioretinitis  
×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×