June 1973
Volume 12, Issue 6
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Articles  |   June 1973
Induction of Delayed-Type Sensitivity-Like Reactions in the Eye by the Injection of Lymphokines
Author Affiliations
  • JOHN W. CHANDLER
    Departments of Ophthalmology and Microbiology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Wash.; Department of Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla. 32601
  • EUGENE R. HEISE
    Departments of Ophthalmology and Microbiology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Wash.
  • RUSSELL S. WEISER
    Departments of Ophthalmology and Microbiology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Wash.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 1973, Vol.12, 400-409. doi:
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      JOHN W. CHANDLER, EUGENE R. HEISE, RUSSELL S. WEISER; Induction of Delayed-Type Sensitivity-Like Reactions in the Eye by the Injection of Lymphokines. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1973;12(6):400-409.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Biologically quiescent small lymphocytes from guinea pigs were placed in contact with a variety of stimuli in vitro and were transformed into active cells as demonstrated by changes in their morphology, production of DNA, and cell division. In association with these biologic events, the stimulated lymphocytes have been shown to release soluble products ("lymphokines") in vitro which exhibit the capacity to kill cells in tissue culture (except lymphocytes), inhibit the migration of macrophages, and produce skin and corneal reactions which are histologically identical to delayed-type sensitivity reactions. In the present investigations, intralamellar corneal and intraocular injections of lymphokines were studied. Corneal injections of lymphokines produced by mixed cultures of allogenic lymphocytes result in inflammatory reactions that closely resembled tuberculin-induced corneal reactions in BCG-immunized guinea pigs. Intraocular injections of lymphokines produced inflammatory exudates which consisted primarily of lymphocytes and macrophages. These studies indicate that lymphokines produced by the interaction of sensitized lymphocytes with antigen are capable of eliciting ocular inflammatory reactions which closely resemble delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions.

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