April 1962
Volume 1, Issue 2
Free
Articles  |   April 1962
The Swelling Pressure of the Corneal Stroma
Author Affiliations
  • CLAES H. DOHLMAN
    Department of Ophthalmology of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Boston, Mass. Paper 114, Retina Foundation.
  • BENGT O. HEDBYS
    Department of Ophthalmology of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Boston, Mass. Paper 114, Retina Foundation.; Fight for Sight Research Fellow, National Council to Combat Blindness, Inc., New York, N. Y.
  • SAIICHI MISHIMA
    Department of Ophthalmology of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary Boston, Mass. Paper 114, Retina Foundation.; E. B. Dunphy Fellow, Boston, Mass.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 1962, Vol.1, 158-162. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      CLAES H. DOHLMAN, BENGT O. HEDBYS, SAIICHI MISHIMA; The Swelling Pressure of the Corneal Stroma. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1962;1(2):158-162.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Various earlier methods to determine the swelling pressure of the corneal stroma are reviewed. Two recent methods are described in more detail: a rapid electronic method for determining the swelling pressure in vitro,4 and a method to determine the fluid pressure in the stroma of the living cornea.5 The stvelling pressure has been determined over a wide range of corneal hydration. At normal water content, the corneal stroma of the cow has a swelling pressure of 55 to 60 mm. Hg. Also, the influence of pH and ionic strength has been studied. If a fine cannida filled with saline and connected to a transducer manometer is inserted into the living cornea, a negative pressure is being built up. Tested on isolated tissue, the fluid pressure has the same numerical value as the swelling pressure. In the living rabbit fluid pressures of -40 to -50 mm. Hg have been found. The molecular basis of the swelling pressure is discussed. The swelling pressure energy is stored mainly in the stromal poly electrolytes, particularly the polysaccharides. Under normal circumstances, the stromal structure seems to be compressed between the epithelium and endothelium by the negative fluid pressure within the tissue which is probably maintained by an active transport across the cellular layers.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×