March 1988
Volume 29, Issue 3
Free
Articles  |   March 1988
Corneal nerves are necessary for adrenergic reactivation of ocular herpes.
Author Affiliations
  • D S Rootman
    LSU Eye Center, Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Medicine, New Orleans 70112-2234.
  • Y Haruta
    LSU Eye Center, Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Medicine, New Orleans 70112-2234.
  • J M Hill
    LSU Eye Center, Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Medicine, New Orleans 70112-2234.
  • H E Kaufman
    LSU Eye Center, Louisiana State University Medical Center School of Medicine, New Orleans 70112-2234.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 1988, Vol.29, 351-356. doi:
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      D S Rootman, Y Haruta, J M Hill, H E Kaufman; Corneal nerves are necessary for adrenergic reactivation of ocular herpes.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1988;29(3):351-356.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) can infect the cornea and achieve ganglionic latency. HSV-1 can later be activated by a variety of effectors although the exact mechanism of reactivation is unknown. Rabbits harboring latent HSV-1 strain McKrae can be induced to shed virus by ocular iontophoresis of epinephrine to the cornea. No studies have been done to investigate if corneal nerves are necessary for epinephrine induction of HSV-1 ocular shedding. We did penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) in one eye each of 23 rabbits; the other eye served as an unoperated control. The surgery effectively denervates the area of the transplant for up to 90 days. Eighteen rabbits carrying latent HSV-1 strain McKrae received corneas from uninfected rabbits. Five uninfected rabbits with no latent virus received corneas from rabbits harboring latent HSV-1. On days 10-14 after penetrating keratoplasty, 24 eyes in the HSV-1 latent group and all ten uninfected eyes received iontophoresis of 0.01% epinephrine (0.8 mAmps for 8 min or 0.6 mAmps for 6 min) once daily for 3 days by means of an eye cup whose diameter was less than the diameter of the transplant. Six rabbits in the HSV-1 latent group received intravenous injections of cyclophosphamide (75 mg/kg) and dexamethasone (4 mg/kg). Following iontophoretic or immunosuppressive induction, the eyes were swabbed daily for 9 days. Of the 12 rabbits with latent virus which were treated by iontophoresis, one of the transplanted eyes and eight of the nontransplanted eyes were induced to shed virus. The mean duration of shedding in the nontransplanted eyes was 3.25 days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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