April 1988
Volume 29, Issue 4
Free
Articles  |   April 1988
Carbon disulfide effects on the visual system. II. Retinogeniculate degeneration.
Author Affiliations
  • T A Eskin
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Neurology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY 14642.
  • W H Merigan
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Neurology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY 14642.
  • R W Wood
    Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine and Neurology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, NY 14642.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science April 1988, Vol.29, 519-527. doi:
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      T A Eskin, W H Merigan, R W Wood; Carbon disulfide effects on the visual system. II. Retinogeniculate degeneration.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1988;29(4):519-527.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

We examined the morphological effects of carbon disulfide exposure on neurons and vasculature of the visual system of macaque monkeys. Five monkeys were exposed to 256 ppm carbon disulfide (CS2) by inhalation for 6 hr a day, 5 days a week. One monkey, sacrificed immediately after exposure, had numerous axonal swellings in the distal optic tract. Four other monkeys survived the exposure period for at least 1 year and were found to have suffered marked degeneration of central retinal ganglion cells, with little or no effect on other neurons in the retina. No evidence was found for arteriosclerotic or aneurysmal changes, suggesting that visual system injury in primates induced by carbon disulfide exposure is not dependent on the occurrence of structural changes in retinal blood vessels.

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