June 1988
Volume 29, Issue 6
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Articles  |   June 1988
Ca-ATPase activity in the rabbit and bovine lens.
Author Affiliations
  • D Borchman
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Kentucky Lions Eye Research Institute 40202.
  • N A Delamere
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Kentucky Lions Eye Research Institute 40202.
  • C A Paterson
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Kentucky Lions Eye Research Institute 40202.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 1988, Vol.29, 982-987. doi:
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      D Borchman, N A Delamere, C A Paterson; Ca-ATPase activity in the rabbit and bovine lens.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1988;29(6):982-987.

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Abstract

Membrane-rich vesicle preparations of rabbit and bovine lenses were prepared in such a manner as to preserve ATPase activity. The lipid:protein ratio of these preparations was increased 22- to 33-fold with a 94% recovery of total phospholipid. Using this preparation, calcium stimulated ATPase was routinely determined in both individual lenses and in pooled specimens. The pattern of stimulation of ATPase activity by a range of calcium concentrations was found to be similar in membrane preparations of epithelium and cortex, from rabbit and bovine lenses. The concentration of calcium necessary for half-maximal stimulation of ATPase activity was approximately 10(-6) M. Calcium concentrations in excess of 10(-4) M reduced the ATPase activity. Calcium-ATPase was undetectable in the lens nuclear region of both species. The regional distribution of sodium-potassium ATPase was also measured.

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