January 1986
Volume 27, Issue 1
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Articles  |   January 1986
Free epsilon amino groups and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural contents in clear and cataractous human lenses.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science January 1986, Vol.27, 98-102. doi:
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      G N Rao, E Cotlier; Free epsilon amino groups and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural contents in clear and cataractous human lenses.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1986;27(1):98-102.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The free epsilon-amino groups and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) contents were determined in soluble and insoluble proteins of clear human lenses and diabetic and nondiabetic senile cataractous lenses. The free epsilon-amino group content of soluble proteins in diabetic cataracts was decreased by 37% (P less than 0.01), whereas in nondiabetic senile cataracts it did not differ from that of clear lenses. The free epsilon-amino group content of insoluble proteins both in diabetic and nondiabetic cataracts was decreased significantly (P less than 0.001, P less than 0.015, respectively). The 5-HMF content of soluble proteins in diabetic cataracts was increased by 52% (P less than 0.001), whereas in nondiabetic cataracts it did not change from that of clear lenses. The 5-HMF content of insoluble proteins in diabetic as well as in nondiabetic cataracts was increased significantly as compared to that of clear lens (P less than 0.001, P less than 0.001, respectively). The soluble protein of diabetic and nondiabetic cataracts was decreased with an increase in the insoluble protein content. These results suggest that nonenzymatic glycosylation plays a role in the conformational change of lens proteins in both diabetic and nondiabetic cataracts.

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