May 1988
Volume 29, Issue 5
Free
Articles  |   May 1988
Altered proteoglycans in cultured human retinitis pigmentosa retinal pigment epithelium.
Author Affiliations
  • A T Hewitt
    Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute, Johns Hopkins University Medical School, Baltimore, MD 21205.
  • D A Newsome
    Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute, Johns Hopkins University Medical School, Baltimore, MD 21205.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science May 1988, Vol.29, 720-726. doi:
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      A T Hewitt, D A Newsome; Altered proteoglycans in cultured human retinitis pigmentosa retinal pigment epithelium.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1988;29(5):720-726.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Proteoglycans are involved in a variety of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. These include cell adhesion, growth regulation and a number of developmental processes. Their involvement in such interactions may be of particular importance in retinitis pigmentosa (RP) because of the detachment and migration of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells often associated with this condition. Because of these important functions in cell behavior, we have been studying the proteoglycans produced by human RPE and how these may be altered in RP. Confluent cultures of RPE from normal donors and from two donors with dominantly inherited RP were labeled with 3H-glucosamine and 35SO4 and the proteoglycans isolated from the medium, substratum and two cell membrane-associated compartments, designated "EDTA-released" and "cell-associated." The proteoglycans were analyzed for size distribution by Sepharose CL-4B chromatography and for glycosaminoglycan (GAG) composition based on enzymatic and chemical susceptibilities. Differences in size distribution and GAG composition were found between the two cell-associated compartments on normal cells. Retinitis pigmentosa proteoglycans differed from their normal counterparts in corresponding compartments both in size distribution and GAG composition. Most affected were those proteoglycans released from the cell surface by EDTA. These findings may be of importance in retinitis pigmentosa since alterations in these molecules could influence the way RPE cells interact with their microenvironment.

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