March 1988
Volume 29, Issue 3
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Articles  |   March 1988
Development of a biopolymeric keratoprosthetic material. Evaluation in vitro and in vivo.
Author Affiliations
  • V Trinkaus-Randall
    Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, MA 02118.
  • J Capecchi
    Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, MA 02118.
  • A Newton
    Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, MA 02118.
  • A Vadasz
    Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, MA 02118.
  • H Leibowitz
    Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, MA 02118.
  • C Franzblau
    Department of Biochemistry, Boston University School of Medicine, MA 02118.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science March 1988, Vol.29, 393-400. doi:
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      V Trinkaus-Randall, J Capecchi, A Newton, A Vadasz, H Leibowitz, C Franzblau; Development of a biopolymeric keratoprosthetic material. Evaluation in vitro and in vivo.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1988;29(3):393-400.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

Based on the results of in vitro and in vivo experiments, we have determined that the optimal material for the central transparent portion of a perforating keratoprosthesis is a polyvinyl alcohol copolymer hydrogel. The material supports the maintenance and growth of corneal epithelium in vitro as shown by population doublings and transmission electron microscopy. Discs preseeded with epithelial cells were cultured in vitro and transplanted into rabbit corneas. The proliferation of these cells in vivo was demonstrated using 3H-thymidine. Other experiments showed that the preseeded cells not only migrated from the central disc onto the peripheral rim of the host cornea but also that host peripheral epithelial cells migrated onto the anterior surface of the disc. The experiments described in this paper demonstrate that corneal epithelial cells preseeded onto hydrogel discs and transplanted into rabbit corneas remain adherent and are capable of proliferating.

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