January 1988
Volume 29, Issue 1
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Articles  |   January 1988
Central visual fields for short wavelength sensitive pathways in glaucoma and ocular hypertension.
Author Affiliations
  • G Heron
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley 94720.
  • A J Adams
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley 94720.
  • R Husted
    School of Optometry, University of California, Berkeley 94720.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science January 1988, Vol.29, 64-72. doi:
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      G Heron, A J Adams, R Husted; Central visual fields for short wavelength sensitive pathways in glaucoma and ocular hypertension.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1988;29(1):64-72.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

While conventional clinical visual acuity and kinetic visual fields may be essentially normal in ocular hypertension and early stages of glaucoma, other foveal aspects of vision (eg color, spatial and temporal contrast sensitivity) may be quite abnormal. Specifically, a selective vulnerability of the short wavelength sensitive (SWS) visual pathways in these conditions has previously been noted. Here we studied the central visual fields of 33 primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) patients, 32 ocular hypertensives (OHT), and 24 age-matched normal controls using blue and yellow test flashes on bright yellow backgrounds. SWS cone and MWS and/or LWS cone pathway sensitivities were measured at the fovea and at 2.5 degrees, 5 degrees, 10 degrees and 15 degrees eccentricities, in either the inferior temporal (for OHT) or horizontal nasal retina (for POAG). As expected, all groups had normal sensitivity to yellow flashes--detected by LWS and/or MWS cones--in these meridians. By comparison, for the blue flashes--detected by the SWS cones--the POAG and OHT groups had sensitivity deficits, uniformly across the central visual field, of about 6X and 1.8X, respectively, compared to normals. While six of 31 (19%) OHT subjects had localized glaucomatous field defects (greater than 0.4 log units) in the non-foveal inferior temporal retina, none of the 12 OHT subjects who were also tested in the horizontal nasal retina showed loss in this meridian. Finally, while no POAG subjects had localized sensitivity loss for yellow flashes in the horizontal nasal retina, four did show local field defects with blue test flashes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

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