February 1989
Volume 30, Issue 2
Free
Articles  |   February 1989
Growth of human corneal endothelial cells in culture.
Author Affiliations
  • B Y Yue
    Department of Ophthalmology, Lions of Illinois Eye Research Institute, University of Illinois, Chicago 60612.
  • J Sugar
    Department of Ophthalmology, Lions of Illinois Eye Research Institute, University of Illinois, Chicago 60612.
  • J E Gilboy
    Department of Ophthalmology, Lions of Illinois Eye Research Institute, University of Illinois, Chicago 60612.
  • J L Elvart
    Department of Ophthalmology, Lions of Illinois Eye Research Institute, University of Illinois, Chicago 60612.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science February 1989, Vol.30, 248-253. doi:https://doi.org/
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    • Get Citation

      B Y Yue, J Sugar, J E Gilboy, J L Elvart; Growth of human corneal endothelial cells in culture.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1989;30(2):248-253. doi: https://doi.org/.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

We investigated the effects of various culture conditions on the growth of normal human corneal endothelial cells in culture. Falcon Primaria tissue culture plastic was found to provide a more suitable surface for endothelial cell growth than the conventional Corning tissue culture plastic. Also, media containing 10% fetal bovine serum and 5% calf serum (complete media) facilitated the growth of human cells better than those containing Nu-serum. Supplementation with epidermal or fibroblast growth factor (10 and 100 ng/ml) to the complete media had no effect on human endothelial cell growth. Chondroitin sulfate at low concentrations (100 micrograms/ml to 1 mg/ml) also showed little effect. At high concentrations (13.5 and 25 mg/ml), however, chondroitin sulfate significantly promoted human corneal endothelial cell growth during a 1- to 2-week incubation period. From the 37 cultures initiated, outgrowth from explants appeared within 3 to 7 days. Cells were polygonal in shape and, at confluency, formed a continuous monolayer. We attained a success rate of 87% (7/8) growing primary cultures from donors under 20 years of age and a 59% (17/29) success rate from older donors.

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