June 1988
Volume 29, Issue 6
Free
Articles  |   June 1988
Preretinal oxygen changes in the rabbit under conditions of light and dark.
Author Affiliations
  • T N Tillis
    Eye Research Institute of Retina Foundation, Boston, Massachusetts 02114.
  • D L Murray
    Eye Research Institute of Retina Foundation, Boston, Massachusetts 02114.
  • G J Schmidt
    Eye Research Institute of Retina Foundation, Boston, Massachusetts 02114.
  • J J Weiter
    Eye Research Institute of Retina Foundation, Boston, Massachusetts 02114.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science June 1988, Vol.29, 988-991. doi:
  • Views
  • PDF
  • Share
  • Tools
    • Alerts
      ×
      This feature is available to authenticated users only.
      Sign In or Create an Account ×
    • Get Citation

      T N Tillis, D L Murray, G J Schmidt, J J Weiter; Preretinal oxygen changes in the rabbit under conditions of light and dark.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1988;29(6):988-991.

      Download citation file:


      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

      ×
  • Supplements
Abstract

Preretinal oxygen measurements were made in pigmented rabbits under conditions of light and dark. The avascular rabbit retina was chosen to eliminate the effects of autoregulation by the retinal vasculature, thus more clearly defining the role of the photoreceptors on preretinal measurements of oxygen delivery from the choroid. Measurements were made 50-100 micron away from the retina using oxygen microelectrodes. An average preretinal oxygen value of 9.8 +/- 1.3 SE mm Hg (n = 12) was measured in room light under normoxic conditions. A change from light to dark conditions always resulted in a measured decrease in preretinal oxygen levels. During the first 30 min of dark adaptation, a 25.8% (+/- 5.5% SD) decrease was obtained. This oxygen decrease is reversible during sequential light adaptation, reaching plateau in approximately 15-20 min. These results indicate that the photoreceptors have a significant effect on choroidal oxygen transmission across the retina.

×
×

This PDF is available to Subscribers Only

Sign in or purchase a subscription to access this content. ×

You must be signed into an individual account to use this feature.

×