September 1989
Volume 30, Issue 9
Free
Articles  |   September 1989
Proteins secreted by human trabecular cells. Glucocorticoid and other effects.
Author Affiliations
  • A J Yun
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California Medical Center, San Francisco 94143.
  • C G Murphy
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California Medical Center, San Francisco 94143.
  • J R Polansky
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California Medical Center, San Francisco 94143.
  • D A Newsome
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California Medical Center, San Francisco 94143.
  • J A Alvarado
    Department of Ophthalmology, University of California Medical Center, San Francisco 94143.
Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science September 1989, Vol.30, 2012-2022. doi:
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    • Get Citation

      A J Yun, C G Murphy, J R Polansky, D A Newsome, J A Alvarado; Proteins secreted by human trabecular cells. Glucocorticoid and other effects.. Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 1989;30(9):2012-2022.

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      © ARVO (1962-2015); The Authors (2016-present)

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Abstract

The capacity of cultured human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells to secrete an extracellular matrix was studied by indirect immunofluorescence. Synthesis of nine extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins known to be present in the normal trabecular meshwork was assessed in three HTM cell lines. Fourteen primary antibodies were used and cultures were labeled two and four weeks after confluence. The HTM cell lines showed consistent labelling patterns for the normal extracellular connective tissue constituents including collagens (types I, III, IV, V and VI), glycoproteins (laminin and fibronectin) and a basement membrane-associated proteoglycan. These antigens were localized to the basal cell surface in an extracellular reticular pattern corresponding to cell margins. Dextran addition at confluence helped to intensify the staining of these components, but ascorbate had no apparent effect. Interestingly, elastin, another normal component of the trabecular meshwork, was not identified under standard conditions, or after addition of ascorbate or dextran. However, elastin could be detected intracellularly following dexamethasone treatment for three days, and extracellularly in punctate deposits when this treatment was used for 1 or 2 weeks. Our findings indicate that HTM cells may be responsible for the secretion and maintenance of all the major ECM constituents of the trabecular meshwork. The elastin results suggest a possible mechanism contributing to obstruction of outflow in steroid glaucoma if increased amounts of elastin are also produced in vivo. This approach can also serve as a useful baseline for comparison with HTM cell lines treated with glaucoma medications or obtained from patients with glaucoma.

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